Nathan J. Diament


A Tale of Two Cases: Why a Christian Club Matters More Than a Desert Cross

By Nathan J. Diament

Late last month, the Supreme Court announced one of its least important decisions ever in the jurisprudence of “church and state.” One can make this assertion because no matter how the high court ruled, the constitutional order was never imperiled by a cross atop a hill in the Mojave Desert.Read More


Two ‘State’ Challenges

By Nathan J. Diament

In the weeks leading up to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s White House meetings with President Obama, the American Jewish community vigorously debated whether to support a “two-state solution” to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Groups on the left called for Obama to press the Israeli prime minister to openly state his acceptance of the “two-state solution,” while groups on the right urged Netanyahu to resist any presidential arm-twisting.Read More


On the Jewish Agenda(s), Part 2

By Hadar Susskind, Jerome M. Epstein, Nancy Falchuk, Nancy Ratzan, Nathan J. Diament, Gideon Aronoff, Rachel Goldberg, Richard S. Gordon, Ruth Messinger, Susan B. Tuchman and Tom Neumann

The next president will help set the national agenda on a wide range of issues of importance to the Jewish community. While our collective concern for the well-being of Israel has featured prominently in discussions of our community’s stake in the presidential election, Jewish groups are also vigorous participants in debates over a diverse array of other issues both foreign and domestic.Read More


How the GOP Won the Orthodox Vote

By Nathan J. Diament

In the 2000 presidential election, 70% of Orthodox Jews voted for the Democratic ticket; in the 2004 presidential election, 70% of Orthodox Jews voted for the Republican ticket. While most of the American Jewish community remains stalwart in the Democratic camp, second only to African Americans, the Orthodox segment is clearly a swing vote.DespiteRead More


A Bad Faith Decision

By Nathan J. Diament

Your local Jewish federation’s social welfare agency — whether providing counseling to battered women, vocational training to the disabled, care and comfort to the elderly or a host of other noble and needed services — is not, as a matter of law, a Jewish organization. At least, this is now the law in the state of California, whose SupremeRead More



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