Ruth Abusch-Magder


RIP Hostess Brands

By Ruth Abusch-Magder

RIP Hostess Brands
Ding Dongs hold a special place in my heart. My best friend growing up in Canada was an American. Whenever her family would travel to New York they would bring numerous boxes of Ring Dings back with them and keep them in the freezer. Sure, there were lots of similar sandwich cakes in the great white north, but none had a hechsher. If we were particularly well behaved, we would be allowed to take one from the coveted stash. The memory of the feeling of the frozen squishy cake and its filling, still brings a smile to my face.Read More


Why Our Sons Should to Learn to Bake Challah

By Ruth Abusch-Magder

Why Our Sons Should to Learn to Bake Challah
What I mean is that we often ask women to take on the roles or rituals that were traditionally considered male, but rarely teach our sons the things that were long-considered female. Teaching our daughters to don tefillin, read Torah, and say kaddish is important, but so is teaching our sons to bake challah, light Shabbat candles and celebrate Rosh Hodesh.Read More


Two Almond Recipes for Tu B'Shvat

By Ruth Abusch-Magder

Two Almond Recipes for Tu B'Shvat
The date palm is tall and majestic. The olive tree locks oil in its plentiful fruit that anoints kings. The bountiful orange trees were the crown jewels of early Zionism. Yet it is the humble almond tree that grabs our attention when we celebrate the new year of the trees, Tu B’Shvat.Read More


Shabbat Meals: Tower of Babel Menu

By Ruth Abusch-Magder

Shabbat Meals: Tower of Babel Menu
Most of the Shabbat dinners at my home are seasonal. Usually this means relying on what I find fresh in the market to inspire the menu that I make. This week however, I’m taking my inspiration from the seasons of the Torah. In the story of Noah, this week’s Torah part, the tale of the Tower of Babel is told in nine short lines, which provided the inspiration for my Friday night menu with dishes from around the globe.Read More


Turkish Rosh Hashanah Delights

By Ruth Abusch-Magder

Turkish Rosh Hashanah Delights
Start the year off well, be bold, shine forth with simplicity. Rosh Hashanah foods are meant not just to tickle our taste buds but also to inspire. The flavors and textures of holiday foods are meant to encourage the turn towards new possibilities. According Gilda Angel, the author of the “Sephardic Holiday Cooking,” Turkish Jewish cuisine, which relies on bright flavors of vegetables, side lining the heavy spices that dress up other Middle Eastern Jewish culinary traditions, is the perfect way to give the New Year a bright bold fresh start.Read More






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