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Posts Tagged: Naama Shefi Results 4

New York Pop-Ups Deliver the Country's Most Exciting Jewish Fare

L?Chaim! Diners sip cocktails and dig into rich creamy bowls of hummus and crunch salads at a pop-up hosted by EatWith.

Image: Elion Paz

L?Chaim! Diners sip cocktails and dig into rich creamy bowls of hummus and crunch salads at a pop-up hosted by EatWith.

In the late 1800s a saloon owner named Kate Hester purportedly defied Pittsburgh’s new licensing laws by running a secret establishment where locals in the know could drink and enjoy the company of friends and strangers. When the evening’s festivities got too loud — as the story goes — Hester would hush the crowd by saying “Speak easy, boys.” And from Hester’s saying, the term “speakeasy” was coined.

5 Jewish Tastemakers To Watch

Healthy Cooking: White House assistant chef Sam Kass, doesn?t just spend his time in the kitchen. He works closely with Michelle Obama on her ?Let?s Move? campaign.

Image: Getty Images

Healthy Cooking: White House assistant chef Sam Kass, doesn?t just spend his time in the kitchen. He works closely with Michelle Obama on her ?Let?s Move? campaign.

Whether they’re influencing policy, curing pastrami or turning out beautiful plates of kosher fare, these food professionals give us a peek into the hot topics for 2013 — which is shaping up to be a tasty year, and perhaps even a healthy one.

Brisket: The Holy Grail of Jewish Food

Image: Courtesy of the Center for Jewish History

The truth about brisket is that your bubbe’s is probably the best. It’s probably better than my bubbe’s, and better than your neighbor’s bubbe’s, and while no two brisket recipes are the same, we’re all right when we say our briskets are the best. Past that, there aren’t a whole lot of definitives — even the terminology can get a little shady — which is exactly why putting five brisket aficionados on stage to talk about the comfort meat was more than fascinating.

Jewish Food: A Million Ways To Agree To Disagree

Image: Molly Yeh

If there is one teaching that I remember most from my summer camp Shabbats, it’s that part of being a Jew is challenging your beliefs about God: evaluating and re-evaluating your relationship with God, discussing, and possibly questioning a supreme being’s existence. Whether or not you agree with this idea, it appears that a similar evolving principle can be applied to Jewish cuisine. Simply mentioning the term “Jewish food” often sparks a heated debate and questions arise: Is there such a thing? Where exactly does it come from? What defines it? Is it kosher? Can I eat it with chopsticks?

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