UC Debates Free Speech Vs. Federal Protection

Shlomo Dubnov, an associate professor at University of California, San Diego, had an unusually busy schedule the first week of May. Monday, check out the “Palestinian wall” erected on campus, then attend a pro-Palestinian spoken word performance and a lecture on “Palestine: Past, Present & Future.” Wednesday, it was a pro-Palestinian “Speak Out!” and Thursday, a lecture by Alison Weir, who, according to her website, is an expert in the “massive ethnic cleansing accomplished in Israel’s War of Independence” — all organized by the UCSD Muslim Students Association and co-sponsored by the UCSD Office of the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs.


Strauss-Kahn’s Journey From Acceptance to Sex Scandal

Just weeks ago, Dominique Strauss-Kahn worried aloud that his Jewish identity would be exploited during France’s upcoming presidential campaign. In what were to have been off-the-record meetings with writers and editors of the French newspaper Libération and the newsmagazine Marianne, Strauss-Kahn in late April cited money, women — he had admitted to a 2008 extramarital affair with a subordinate at the International Monetary Fund — and his Jewish identity as the issues his political opponents were most likely to seize on as the election season got under way.


Ukrainians Cling to Belief That Demjanjuk Is Innocent

Forget for a moment that John Demjanjuk is guilty. Forget what a German court has just concluded: that he was a camp guard at Sobibor between March and September 1943, when 28,060 mostly Polish Jews were murdered. Imagine instead that Ukrainian-born Demjanjuk, 91, is an innocent, elderly man who has been hounded for 34 years by three governments — American, Israeli and German — for crimes he never committed. You’ll begin to understand the very different way that most people in the Ukrainian-American community have come to view this epic case.


Should USAID Use Public Funds For Religious Entities Overseas?

A seemingly minor proposal buried in the Federal Register is sparking debate over the extent to which separation of religion and state should be maintained beyond American borders. At issue is an attempt by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to ease existing regulations to allow funding for the construction and upkeep of religious institutions overseas.

Raising Children on Kugel and Kimchi, and as Jews

After her husband stepped on the glass, and she survived the chair dance at their wedding without falling off, Emily Brecher changed into a traditional red Chinese dress. “Then my husband and I knelt down before my parents and my Jewish in-laws at the tea ceremony,” Brecher recalled. “The dim sum hors d’oeuvres were a huge hit.” It’s an increasingly familiar story: Asian-Jewish weddings creating families that celebrate Rosh Hashanah and the Lunar New Year and bring up their children on kugel and kimchi.

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