Israeli Clocks Fall Back Early — And Some Object

Israel moved back to Standard Time, bringing out demonstrators in protest of the early switch due to Yom Kippur.

Dozens of protesters demonstrated Saturday night in Tel Aviv against the decision of Interior Minister Eli Yishai of the haredi Orthodox Shas Party to turn back the clock in mid-September in order to accommodate an early end to the Yom Kippur fast.

The protesters from the Israel Hofshit organization, or Be Free Israel, which promotes religious freedom, said their quality of life was damaged by the change.

A law passed in 2005 requires that Israel move to Standard Time the Sunday morning before Yom Kippur, which falls anywhere in September and half of October each year. Legislation to extend Daylight Savings Time into October was adopted this year by Yishai, but it was not brought before the whole Knesset in time for consideration before this year’s change.

Europe moves to Standard Time on Oct. 28, and the United States follows on Nov. 4.

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Israeli Clocks Fall Back Early — And Some Object

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