Israel Bill Would Open Door to Adoption by Non-Orthodox Families

A new bill would allow non-Orthodox Israeli parents to adopt non-Jewish children.

The bill was approved Sunday by the Ministerial Committee for Legislation and would amend the current Adoption Law. It must undergo a preliminary reading in the Knesset and pass two more readings before becoming official.

Under the current law, only Orthodox couples are allowed to adopt non-Jewish children, since it is understood that they will convert the child to Judaism under halachic auspices. Non-Orthodox couples must either adopt Jewish children or offer proof that they will become religiously observant, convert the child properly, and raise the child in a religiously observant home.

The bill was submitted by lawmaker Adi Kol of the centrist Yesh Atid party.

Tagged as:

Written by


Your Comments

The Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Forward requires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not and will be deleted. Egregious commenters will be banned from commenting. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and the Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.

Recommend this article

Israel Bill Would Open Door to Adoption by Non-Orthodox Families

Thank you!

This article has been sent!