Jewish Groups Launch Fair Trade Network, Support Communal Social Justice Efforts

A new partnership has launched to enable the purchase of kosher “fair trade” coffee, tea and chocolate while supporting Jewish communal efforts on human trafficking and worker justice.

The Jewish Fair Trade Partnership allows individuals and Jewish institutions like synagogues to purchase fair trade products at wholesale prices while supporting Equal Exchange, Fair Trade Judaica and T’ruah: The Rabbinic Call for Human Rights.

Fair trade products are designed to help farmers, primarily in developing countries, stay on their land, support their families, plan for the future and care for the environment. A portion of the proceeds from sales will support T’ruah and Fair Trade Judaica’s work promoting the end of modern-day slavery and protecting workers’ rights.

“Jewish law goes to great length to protect low-wage workers, whom our tradition knows are vulnerable to exploitation,” said Rabbi Jill Jacobs, executive director of T’ruah, in a news release issued jointly by the partner organizations. “Through this project, our sacred spaces will reflect the values of our tradition.”

A network of 1,800 rabbis and cantors, T’ruah (formerly Rabbis for Human Rights-North America) focuses on human rights issues globally and describes itself as the “leading Jewish organization working to end modern-day slavery.”

Founded in 2007, California-based Fair Trade Judaica works to create a “Jewish-based ethical consumer model” and sells a variety of Judaica products meeting specific standards assuring fair and livable wages, no child labor, and healthy and safe working conditions.

Since 1998, the Equal Exchange Interfaith Program has involved more than 10,000 religious institutions in purchasing fair trade products. Current partners include Lutheran World Relief, United Methodist Committee on Relief, Catholic Relief Services, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), and the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee. The Jewish Fair Trade Project includes Equal Exchange kosher-certified coffee, tea and chocolate products. Most of the products are listed as kosher for Passover.

Author

Your Comments

The Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. All readers can browse the comments, and all Forward subscribers can add to the conversation. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Forward requires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not and will be deleted. Egregious commenters or repeat offenders will be banned from commenting. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and the Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.

Recommend this article

Jewish Groups Launch Fair Trade Network, Support Communal Social Justice Efforts

Thank you!

This article has been sent!

Close