White House Needs Only 1 More Senator To Claim Iran Victory

Supporters of the international nuclear agreement with Iran moved within one vote of mustering enough support to protect the deal in the U.S. Congress on Tuesday when two more Democratic senators said they would support the pact.

Senators Bob Casey and Chris Coons, known as Iran hard-liners, both said they backed the agreement announced on July 14 between the United States, five other world powers and Tehran.

“I will support this agreement because it puts us on a known path of limiting Iran’s nuclear program for the next 15 years with the full support of the international community,” Coons said in a speech at the University of Delaware.

Their support means that 33 members of the Senate, 31 Democrats and two independents who vote with them, now support the deal, seen as a potential legacy foreign policy achievement for Democratic President Barack Obama.

Two Senate Democrats oppose the pact, along with the overwhelming majority of Republicans in the chamber.

Backers will need 34 votes in the Senate or 146 in the House of Representatives to sustain Obama’s veto if a Republican-sponsored resolution of disapproval passes both chambers.

Growing support has raised hopes that deal supporters might gather the 41 votes to use a procedural motion to block a disapproval resolution in the Senate and keep Obama from having to use his veto power.

At least three House Democrats also announced support for the deal on Tuesday, including Adam Smith, the top Democrat on the House Armed Services Committee. A total of 90 House members, all Democrats, now back the deal.

Congress has until Sept. 17 to vote on a resolution. If it passes both chambers, and lawmakers overrode Obama’s veto, the president would lose his ability to temporarily waive many U.S. sanctions on Iran.

That could torpedo the agreement, in which Iran agreed to curtail its nuclear program in exchange for relief from crippling economic sanctions.

Among other concerns, opponents of the deal say it gives up too much to Tehran and does not include strong enough inspections of Iran’s nuclear facilities. They say the United States should push for a tougher deal.

Casey said he had studied the agreement intensively. He issued a lengthy analysis explaining his decision.

“It places strict limitations on Iran’s nuclear program, requires robust monitoring and verification measures, and grants relief only from nuclear sanctions in exchange for verified actions on Iran’s part,” he said.

Your Comments

The Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. All readers can browse the comments, and all Forward subscribers can add to the conversation. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Forward requires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not and will be deleted. Egregious commenters or repeat offenders will be banned from commenting. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and the Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.

Recommend this article

White House Needs Only 1 More Senator To Claim Iran Victory

Thank you!

This article has been sent!

Close