Dutch Cemetery Discovers 11 Lost Jewish Graves

(JTA) — Construction workers in the Netherlands discovered bodies at a former Jewish cemetery that was believed to have been relocated in its entirety decades ago.

The 11 bodies, which were buried some time before 1828, were found earlier this month during groundwork in Winschoten, a town in the northeast of the Netherlands, Dutch Chief Rabbi Binyomin Jacobs said, and were reburied Monday at a newer Jewish cemetery.

Located in the center of town, the site functioned as a Jewish burial ground until 1969, when the bodies were moved to another site. It saw its last burial in 1828, before the passing of regulations that made its use as a cemetery impossible.

“It is remarkable that the city authorities suspended the dig immediately,” said Jacobs, who oversaw the exhumation of the bodies for reburial at the Sint Vitusholt cemetery in Winschoten together with an archaeologist and a team of diggers.

He said the bodies had been left behind during the moving of most other human remains in 1969.

Author

Your Comments

The Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. All readers can browse the comments, and all Forward subscribers can add to the conversation. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Forward requires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not and will be deleted. Egregious commenters or repeat offenders will be banned from commenting. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and the Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.

Recommend this article

Dutch Cemetery Discovers 11 Lost Jewish Graves

Thank you!

This article has been sent!

Close