The Schmooze

Symphonies for Space Cadets

For those familiar with One Ring Zero’s sound — a sometimes-kooky, sometimes-eerie blend of forsaken instruments like theremin, claviola, and glockenspiel — it will come as no surprise that the band’s latest album, “Planets,” is a musical tour through outer space. Given their fondness for far-out noises, it was only a matter of time before band leaders Joshua Camp and Michael Hearst — who’ve been making music together for a decade now — thought to respond to English composer Gustav Holst’s 1920 orchestral suite with their own homage to “the splendor and complexity of our celestial neighbors.”

Like the Holst suite, “Planets” has its somber, ponderous moments, but Camp and Hearst bring to their planet sketches the exuberant sense of humor that Holst’s solemn, astrologically derived portraits lack. In Holst’s solar system, the planets are far-off, majestic, uninhabitable spheres; in One Ring Zero’s, they’re potential sites for love affairs, dance parties, and bar mitzvahs.

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Symphonies for Space Cadets

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