The Schmooze

Friday Film: Behind Friendly Lines

It takes a midnight downpour to force a mutiny and forge a temporary unit from the misfits on Israel Defence Force Training Base 4, nearly three-quarters of the way through Georgian-Israeli director Dover Kosashvili’s new film.

“Where did they find such a group of losers?” mutters the troop commander, as they stubbornly shuffle together like a heard of defiant cows.

The answer is from North African immigrants, Holocaust survivors, idealistic kibbutzniks, rich Jerusalemites and the sons of their maids. But first and foremost, from a list of applicants medically unfit for regular service.

Set in 1956, “Infiltration” is Kosashvili’s fourth picture, an adaptation of Yehoshua Kenaz’s 1986 novel of the same name. Debuting earlier this year at the Jerusalem Film Festival and picking up six nominations at the Israeli Film Academy Awards, “Infiltration” recently screened at the BFI Film Festival in London and opened in wide release in Israeli theaters.

Recommend this article

Friday Film: Behind Friendly Lines

Thank you!

This article has been sent!

Close
Close