The Schmooze

'Liberty' Tells Human Story of Immigrants

There’s a lot more to the Statue of Liberty than stone, copper and a great view of New York Harbor.

As the new musical “Liberty” points out, it was living, breathing people – many of them Jewish – helped turn Lady Liberty into an iconic symbol of freedom.

Written by brother-and-sister team Jon and Dana Leslie Goldstein, “Liberty” recasts its eponymous heroine from inanimate statue to a French immigrant girl living in 1884 New York.

She meets prominent people who help her along the ways, including a handful of Jews.

Joseph Pulitzer, the newspaper magnate, mobilizes the public to give to the construction of Liberty’s pedestal with his decision to print names of donors publicly. Emma Lazarus, the poet, pens the lines inscribed below Liberty’s feet that famously offer refuge to the “huddled masses.”

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'Liberty' Tells Human Story of Immigrants

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