Arts & Culture


Osirak, 25 Years Later

By Shay Shaked

Last week marked the 25th anniversary of the Osirak bombing, when Israeli fighter planes bombed a French-built nuclear plant near Baghdad. The destruction of the near-completed reactor, which Israel believed was designed to make nuclear weapons to destroy Israel, was met with strong denunciation from the world community. A quarter-century laterRead More


Dumb Luck

By Dorothy Gallagher

On my way to Moscow last September, I stopped off in the Ukraine. Since I was going in that direction anyway, I wanted to take a look at my mother’s hometown. The town is called Murafa, and it is a very small town, not even a dot on most maps. If, by some chance, you want to locate it, find Kiev on the map, then move yourRead More


The Whole Story on Being Half-Jewish

By Sana Krasikov

Half/Life: Jewish Tales

From Interfaith Homes Edited by Laurel Snyder Soft Skull Press, 280 pages, $14.95. * * *Much has been written about intermarriage in America, from informal polls and academic research to vituperative op-eds and book-length explorations. And yet, a surprisingly small portion of this literature actually documents theRead More


What’s in This Name?

By Philologos

Paul Baron writes in an e-mail:“Ikh bin a higer geborener un ikh bin fier un akhtzig yor alt. [I was born in this country and I’m 84 years old.] My father came from what is now Lithuania. He told me that his father, my grandfather, was a shafer (with the ‘a’ pronounced ‘ah’) and that he worked for a German firm thatRead More


The Clouds Lift

By Daniel M. Jaffe

‘Y know Torah, Leah Kleinbaum?’“There was a time.” Leah sighs at this Yiddish-speaking stranger on her doorstep. Only three weeks here and already half of Haifa knows she’s a widow just arrived from Kiev. Who is this man? A farkakte suitor? More chins than she can count, and look how he leans on that cane — not exactly an advertisement forRead More


A Center Of Creativity Looks Back In Time

In celebration of its 75th anniversary, the Art Center of the 92nd Street Y presents Process and Promise: Art Education and Community at the 92nd Street Y, 1930-2005. The exhibit includes 75 works by current and former faculty members, as well as archival material and photographs detailing the center’s history. The art program was central to theRead More


Metropolita New York

FORWARD, JUNE 16, 2006 ExhibitGreat Works: Max Liebermann: From Realism to Impressionism is an exhibition that offers insight into the career and work of the Berlin artist who was once considered a leading figure in the city’s cultural life. Liebermann (1847-1935), a prolific artist born to a wealthy German Jewish family, had a careerRead More


A History Of Style

By Sarah Kricheff

Vogue magazine did not exist in the 15th century, but this didn’t stop Europeans of that era from keeping up to date on cutting-edge trends in clothing and fashion. Curious about the customs of people living in other parts of the world, early modern Europeans read costume books and travelogues that had images depicting stylesRead More


Before There Was Wal-Mart, There Was Julius Rosenwald

By Loren Fox

Julius Rosenwald: The Man Who Built Sears, Roebuck

And Advanced the Cause of Black Education in the American South By Peter M. Ascoli Indiana University Press, 392 pages, $35. * * *Although few remember, Sears once set the pace for the mass-market world of retail shopping in ways that Wal-Mart does now. Perhaps even lessRead More


‘Beyond Insane’ Biblical Paintings

By Menachem Wecker

My artist friends think I’m crazy,” said Archie Rand, who is the first to admit that his newest project is “beyond insane.”Indeed, Rand’s series is arguably the most ambitious Jewish art enterprise, perhaps ever: 613 canvases, one per commandment. Surrounded by stacks upon stacks of paintings in his studio, Rand is easy to compare toRead More


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