Books


Four Questions About 'Nemesis' Answered

By Igor Webb

I’ve organized my talk around four questions: 1. How does “Nemesis” fit into the body of Philip Roth’s work? 2. How does “Nemesis” reflect the plague narratives? 3. What should Bucky have done? 4. How much does it matter that Arnie Mesnikoff is the story’s narrator?Read More


Laughing in the Face of Evil

By Laura Hodes

Joseph Skibell’s third novel, “A Curable Romantic,” evokes the spirit of “Candide” with a Jewish postmodern twist in order to ask the same question as Voltaire: How can we be optimistic in the face of evil?Read More


Crazy Is as Crazy Does

By Gordon Haber

British journalist Jon Ronson has forged an estimable career out of one fascinating topic: the belief systems of kooks. His 2001 book, “Them: Adventures with Extremists,” looked at conspiracy theorists — jihadists, neo-Nazis and the like — and their paranoid fantasies about shadowy elites and Jews. He also famously profiled David Icke, the Englishman who claims that the elites are 12-foot lizards. (Ronson inconclusively wonders if by “lizards,” Icke actually means “lizards,” and not “Jews.”)Read More


King Solomon, The Unknown Story

By Glenn Altschuler

Many Christians and Jews believe that the wisdom of King Solomon extended well beyond ordinary human perception. A gift from God, it allowed him to understand the hidden forces of nature, the inner workings of human motivation and the mysteries of the future. Some credit Solomon with an ability to turn lead into gold, conjure demons and become invisible. In Jamaica he is celebrated for discovering marijuana, known there as “the Wisdom Weed.”Read More


Out of the Shadow of Pollock, Lee Krasner Defies the World

By Carmela Ciuraru

In 1956, the artist Jackson Pollock was killed in a car crash in Springs, on the South Fork of Long Island. He was 44 years old and drunk when he drove his Oldsmobile convertible into a tree one fateful August night. He died less than a mile from his home; his mistress, who had been in the car with him, survived the accident.Read More


The Divine Firsts

By Todd Hasak-Lowy

Israeli scholar and poet Zali Gurevitch once asked a room full of kibbutz parents a question he admitted was impossible to answer: If their children were allowed to study only one subject, what would it be? Math? Science? Hebrew? Jewish history? Nope. The kibbutz moms and dads chose the Bible.Read More


Bloodsuckers, Serbs and Ghostly Kabbalists

By Jacob Silverman

In assessing the work of Serbian-Jewish writer David Albahari, any English-language reader would be working with half a deck. Albahari, who writes in Serbian but has lived in Canada since 1994, has published more than 20 books, including novels, short-story collections, a few books of essays and a children’s book. Only six of these works — a career-spanning short-story collection called “Words Are Something Else” and five novels — have been translated into English.Read More


The Optimism of the Will

By Joel Schalit

‘It’s located on Rosa Luxemburg Straße,” she said, “Two blocks from Alexanderplatz. Just take the train, and I’ll meet you there.” Savoring the combination of literary brand names wrapped into that sentence, it all made sense to me. The invitation had been extended by an old friend I’d met through punk circles, in Lon-don, during the 1990s. She’d since moved back to Germany to get better social services for her children, both of whom are disabled. “You’ll love the burritos,” she said before hanging up the phone.Read More


There’s Not No Place Like Home

By Irina Reyn

In his appreciation of the film “The Wizard of Oz,” Salman Rushdie wrote, “The real secret of the ruby slippers is not that ‘there’s no place like home,’ but rather that there is no longer such a place as home: except, of course, for the home we make, or the homes that are made for us, in Oz: which is anywhere, and everywhere, except the place from which we began.”Read More


If You Will It, They Will Come Play Ball

By Jonathan Papernick

When I learned that a professional baseball league would be starting up in Israel in 2007, I was excited that my two great loves, Israel and baseball, would be together at last, like chocolate and peanut butter. America’s pastime had taken root and succeeded in other far-flung places before; professional leagues already thrived in Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, even down under in Australia, so why not Israel?Read More





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