Editorial


Jimmy’s Problem, and Ours

Every great movement for social change has its pivotal events, iconic moments of terrible clarity that capture the nation’s attention, shift the momentum and alter the course of the struggle. The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire was a turning point in the rise of the labor movement. The triple murder of the three civil-rightsRead More


Studying Our Genes

This week’s issue of the Forward includes the 10th-anniversary edition of our annual supplement on Jewish genetic research. It’s a feature that provides a unique service both to the Jewish community and to the broader society, and we’re proud to be able to offer it.The scientific field of Jewish genetics doesn’t receive much publicRead More


Another Florida Fiasco

Amid mounting signs of another Florida fiasco looming over the November election, there was a stark symbolism — probably unintended, but palpable nonetheless — in the invitation extended this month to the respected Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe to send international teams of election observers to watch America’s pollingRead More


Alon’s New Hat

The naming of Alon Pinkas as the new chief executive officer of the American Jewish Congress breaks just about every rule in the unwritten code of Israel-Diaspora relations. It puts an Israeli citizen at the helm of a venerable Jewish agency that prides itself on its distinctly American identity. It puts the organization on a dovish path at a timeRead More


A Tale of Justice

In a display of wry humor that may or may not have been intentional, the British government went to court last week to argue that human rights violations by its occupation forces in Iraq are not subject to international human rights law.The reason, Her Majesty’s lawyers told the high court in London, presumably with a straight face, isRead More


Jack Spitzer

Jack Spitzer, the Seattle banker-philanthropist who died last Saturday at 86, was one of a rapidly disappearing breed in community life: a regular guy who could walk tall across the world stage without forgetting who he was or where he came from. He could lead American delegations to Rome and Cairo, make deals for millions of dollars, thenRead More


Judging the Fence

With its spurious ruling last week on the legality of Israel’s West Bank security fence, the International Court of Justice has created an unnecessary complication in the search for Middle East peace and undermined its own credibility as an arbiter of international law.The truth is that the damage to the court is graver than the damage to IsraelRead More


Cry for Argentina

Ten years have passed since Argentina’s main Jewish communal center was hit by a terrorist bomb on July 18, 1994, leaving 85 persons dead and 250 injured in what remains the worst antisemitic attack since World War II. Ten years of botched investigations, rumormongering, diplomatic stonewalling — yet the case is no closer to resolution. NoneRead More


EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK

The death of Marlon Brando last week revived painful memories of the actor’s controversial appearance on “Larry King Live” on April 5, 1996, in which he criticized Jewish Hollywood moguls for their seeming insensitivity to blacks and other minorities. The interview, coming at a time when public criticism of Jewish influence still wasRead More


Herzl’s Dream

Theodor Herzl was only 37 when he convened the first World Zionist Congress in Switzerland in late August 1897 and began his campaign to create a Jewish state. A Viennese journalist and playwright of middling repute, he somehow had the vision to recognize that he had changed history. “At Basel,” he wrote in his diary right afterward,Read More


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