Editorial


Those Inalienable Rights

Eleven score and seven years ago, an unlikely collection of lawyers, businessmen and plantation owners gathered in Philadelphia and brought forth what remains one of the most remarkable social experiments in human history: the United States of America.The new nation, as envisioned in the declaration signed that July day in 1776, was to be unlikeRead More


‘Who Is a Jew’ Redux

In announcing this week that the Jewish state would grant equal status to Reform and Conservative conversion ceremonies for purposes of citizenship and population registry, Israel’s interior minister took one of those political steps that shouldn’t have been necessary, but was.The unilateral declaration by the minister, Avraham PorazRead More


A Time To Act in Ethiopia

When Israel first threw open its doors in 1984 to Jewish immigration from Ethiopia, the move was rightly hailed as a watershed moment in Zionist history. The Jewish state had become, as Israeli officials and Jewish activists justly boasted, the only country in human history to welcome masses of African immigrants as brothers, not slaves.Today thisRead More


California Scheming

Beyond the grim specter of the most populous state in the union experiencing political and fiscal meltdown, what’s most frightening about the gubernatorial recall effort now underway in California is the sense that in the Golden State we may be witnessing, as we so often do, our future. California, which gave us the movies, themeRead More


1,000 Days

It was 1,000 days ago this week, on September 28, 2000, that Palestinian rioting first broke out in Jerusalem, setting off a cycle of murderous violence that hasn’t stopped yet. While the rioting was at first a momentary event — described by Palestinians as a reaction to Ariel Sharon’s Temple Mount visit that day, though it seemsRead More


Tides Along the Hudson

That new Jewish demographic study released in New York this week examined only the Jews of metropolitan New York. Folks in other communities might be tempted, therefore, to think that the survey’s astonishing findings — including skyrocketing poverty and a surging Orthodox population — are none of their business. But that wouldRead More


Time To Say Yes

Prime Minister Sharon had three very good reasons to go to Aqaba this week and offer the string of conciliatory gestures he presented to the Palestinians. Each reason is compelling on its own merits. Taken together, they ought to give pause to the nay-sayers who claim they’re fighting for Israel by resisting PresidentRead More


Chutzpah

You might think that after promising to cut taxes for all Americans and then discovering that 50 million households — those that most needed it — would get nothing, the Republican leadership would be embarrassed and try to fix things. But that would understate the chutzpah of the Republican leadership, which knows, it seems, noRead More


The Harvest and the Law

Shavuot, the Jewish festival that begins next Thursday evening, June 5, is among the least known of the Jewish holidays in this country. That’s no accident. The central theme of the holiday, the giving of the Law at Sinai, sits uneasily with an American Jewish public that likes to think of religion as a matter of personal choice, notRead More


Counting Character

May was a bad month for heroes. First there was that embarrassing disclosure about William Bennett, the former education secretary and Republican moralist-in-chief, who turned out to have been hiding a massive gambling addiction. To the delight of his detractors and mortification of his admirers, Bennett turned out to be exhibit A in his ownRead More





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