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DER YIDDISH-VINKL December 10, 2004

In tune with the season, Der Yiddish-Vinkl devotes its column this week to the ever-uplifting subject of Hanukkah. What follows are two poems (songs) about this joyful holiday. The transliterations are by Goldie A Gold; the English versions are by Gus Tyler.The first piece is by M. Rivesman.

                      Khanike, Oy, Khanike

                    

Khanike, oy,Read More


DER YIDDISH-VINKL December 3, 2004

Stanley Siegelman, as steady readers of Der Vinkl must know, is blessed with not only the witty word, but also a sharp eye for unusual news. His current subject deals with a school for gays in the New York City public school system. Here is his Yiddish version on the subject, followed by his English version.Read More

                      A Talmud Torah far Feygelakh

                    

DER YIDDISH-VINKL November 26, 2004

On the 35th yahrzeit of Leib Feinberg, the pages of the Forverts devoted to Pearls of Yiddish Poetry featured the adventuresome life and the passionate penitent poetry of this unusual genius. A graduate of Moscow University (1919) he became an officer of the Red Guard. For most of his early life, he was a dedicated Communist, singing the praisesRead More


DER YIDDISH-VINKL November 19, 2004

On the 20th yahrzeit of Rokhl Fishman, the pages of the Forverts dedicated to “Pearls of Yiddish Poetry” featured this lyrical young poetess and her works. Born in Philadelphia in 1935, she was an activist in the Workmen’s Circle and in Zionist movements. She first began to be published in Der Nayer Dor (The NewRead More


DER YIDDISH-VINKL November 12, 2004

Yiddish songs and poetry cover the gamut of human emotions, from moaning and groaning to dancing and prancing, and all that falls between a sad tomorrow and days without sorrow. What follows is a poem by Soviet Jewish poet Yousef Kotlier (1908-1962) as it appears in transliterated form in “Songs of Generations” compiled by Eleanor and JosephRead More


DER YIDDISH-VINKL November 5, 2004

Ruth Rubin’s book “Jewish Folk Songs,” published about a half-century ago, remains one of the treasure troves of Yiddishkeit in America. The multitalented Rubin was a performer, a recording artist and a translator of Yiddish folk songs into English. What follows is one of her masterpieces, titled “Sheyn Bin Ikh, Sheyn.”Read More


DER YIDDISH-VINKL October 22, 2004

On the occasion of her 60th yahrzeit, the Yiddish Forverts featured Miriam Ulinover on its page dedicated to Pearls of Yiddish Poetry. Orphaned as a child, she was raised by her grandmother, to whom she dedicated a book of poetry titled “Der Bubbe’s Oytser” (“Grandma’s Treasure”). Ulinover described her poetry in the following lines:Read More


DER YIDDISH-VINKL October 15, 2004

Mothers-in-law have for ages been a matter of concern to folk who are marrying off a daughter. Will the mekhuteneste move in and try to dictate the behavior of her daughter-in-law? Apparently, this is not uncommon. Rarely, however, has anyone tried to write a song depicting the troublesome relationship between a bride’s parents and herRead More


DER YIDDISH-VINKL October 8, 2004

As the Jewish New Year approached, the pages of the Forverts devoted to Pearls of Yiddish Poetry ran several poems by different authors about Rosh Hashanah. They were all written in the past, and refer to these poets’ feelings and thoughts about the New Year at that time. What follows is a poem by Shimen Frug titled “Dos Kvitl” (“TheRead More


DER YIDDISH-VINKL October 1, 2004

An old Yiddish ditty advises us about the drinking habits of a yid and a goy: Shiker iz a goy

Shiker iz er, trinken miz er,

Vayl er iz a goy.

Nikhter iz a yid

Nikhter iz er, davnen miz er

Vayl er iz a yid. But this easy characterization of the drinking habits of Jews and Gentiles is refuted in other popular Yiddish songs, suchRead More





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