Forward Forum


In Jerusalem, Fundamentalism on the March

By Jay Michaelson

‘Good morning, Iran/the loudspeaker calls/How we feared/that this day would come.” So sang Israeli pop star Aviv Geffen eight years ago, reacting to the growing strength of the ultra-Orthodox parties in Israel, and fearing that, demographics being what they are, things would only get worse.Read More


The Two Faces of Bashar Al-Assad

By Ileana Ros-Lehtinen

Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad recently announced his readiness to make peace with Israel, but he also declared his readiness to pursue war. In a recent interview with Spanish newspaper El Pais, Assad expressed his willingness for Syria to return to the negotiating table with Israel but concluded that if a peace agreement could not be reached within six months, there would be war. This past weekend, Assad also gave separate interviews with the BBC and a Kuwaiti daily Al-Anbaa. True to form, Assad called for a resumption of peace negotiations during the BBC interview, and in Al-Anbaa, the Syrian president declared he is now preparing for war with Israel.Read More


The General Assembly’s Youth Deficit

By Ariel Beery

Upon entering this year’s General Assembly of United Jewish Communities in Los Angeles, one is immediately greeted by colorful pictures of young Jews hugging beside the slogan of this year’s gathering, “One People, One Destiny.” The slogan reflects both the G.A.’s focus on the aftermath of Israel’s war with Hezbollah as well as widespread concern following studies reporting that there is a marked decrease in the younger generation’s identification with Jewish peoplehood.Read More


All Worked Up, About All the Wrong Things

By Leonard Fein

It is a puzzlement: How can a community so smart and sophisticated as ours so frequently overreact, under-react, be so off course? Three examples…Read More


A Hollow Leadership, And a Miracle Squandered

By David Grossman

The annual memorial ceremony for Yitzhak Rabin is the moment when we pause for a while to remember Rabin the man, the leader. And we also take a look at ourselves, at Israeli society, its leadership, the national mood, the state of the peace process, at ourselves as individuals in the face of national events.Read More


On Campus, a Culture of Conformity

By Gary A. Tobin

It is a well-known fact that professors lean to the left. According to a recently released study by the Institute for Jewish & Community Research, professors are more likely to identify as liberals than as conservatives by a ratio of 3-to-1. In the social sciences and humanities the figure is 5-to-1.Read More


Rescue and Resistance

By Jeremy Ben-Ami

Sixty-eight years ago this week, Adolf Hitler unleashed the infamous Kristallnacht pogrom. Savage mobs beat and murdered Jews, smashed their stores and burned down synagogues throughout Germany and Austria. My father, then 25, barely eluded this hurricane of destruction: He was on a boat just down river from Vienna, leading 550 Jewish refugees to safety.Read More


Ehud Olmert’s Amateur Defense

By Yossi Alpher

One can’t entirely blame Ehud Olmert for feeling smug these days. He expanded his governing coalition, guaranteed that the 2007 budget will pass in the Knesset and stabilized his government after the tribulations of this summer’s war in Lebanon and in anticipation of the findings of the Winograd Commission investigating that war. And he did all this at a ridiculously low political price. A grandiose but empty ministerial title for Avigdor Lieberman (“minister for strategic threats,” which sounds like something out of Monty Python) brought Yisrael Beiteinu’s 11 Knesset members into the coalition. And a deputy ministry and chairmanships of a couple of committees on Arab affairs kept Amir Peretz’s Labor Party from leaving in protest.Read More


Piling Debt on Debt

By Gus Tyler

Once upon a time, the Republican Party prided itself on its businesslike way of running government — namely, pinching each penny and borrowing as little as possible. For years, the GOP regularly attacked the Democrats as the party of “tax and spend.” The Democrats were spendthrifts, while the GOP was thrifty. Now, as the Bush administration winds up its sixth year in office, it appears set to establish an all-time record for unbalanced budgets and mounting debt.Read More


The Road to Justice in Argentina Leads to Iran

By David A. Harris

On July 18, 1994, the deadliest postwar terrorist attack against a Jewish target took place in Buenos Aires. The seven-story headquarters of the AMIA, the Argentine Jewish community’s central welfare body, was destroyed. Eighty-five people, Jews and non-Jews alike, were killed; hundreds were wounded. It followed in the wake of another deadly terrorist assault in Buenos Aires two years earlier, against the Israeli Embassy.Read More


Would you like to receive updates about new stories?






















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.