Genetics


The Ties That Bind

By Debra Nussbaum Cohen

What is the essence of Jewish identity? Is it revealed in the choices we make, like giving tzedakah or observing the Sabbath, or is it in our genetic code? Is it a matter of faith, or a matter of heritability? Is it something we can choose, or is it a biological imperative embedded in nearly every cell of our body?Read More


Discovering the Newest Jewish Genetic Disease

By Talia Bloch

One day, about four years ago, a young couple came to Dr. Alan Shanske’s office looking for help. They had already been to numerous doctors, but none of them was able to diagnose their 4-year-old son.Read More


Sick Texas Sheep May Aid Tay-Sachs Fight

By Lauren F. Friedman

Fred and Joan Horak have been ranchers since 1985, so 11 years ago, when Joan noticed that two lambs from her flock had tilted heads and wobbly legs, she knew something was amiss. Little did the Horaks know that their discovery of these two sick lambs would end up providing new hope in the search for a treatment for a deadly genetic disease that afflicts humans.Read More


Intermarriage Spurs Tay-Sachs Advisory

By Lauren F. Friedman

Citing rising Jewish intermarriage rates, the leading organization devoted to combating Tay-Sachs is urging doctors to encourage the use of more comprehensive testing methodology to identify carriers of the deadly genetic disease.Read More


Improve FDA’s Rare Disease Review Process

By Jonathan Jacoby

The Jewish community has long been a leader in supporting medical research and education efforts, especially with regard to those diseases that disproportionately afflict people of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. Creating coalitions with other patient advocates in the rare disease community would give American Jews an opportunity to advance efforts to fight diseases that disproportionately affect Jews, as well as to participate in an important public policy debate involving millions in this country.Read More


Enlisting Rabbis in the Push for Screening

By Talia Bloch

“My wife and I were married by two rabbis, one Conservative and the other Reform, and neither of them gave us any information about Jewish genetic diseases.” So begins the story of Lawrence Sernovitz, himself now an associate rabbi at the Old York Road Temple-Beth Am in Abington, Pa. A little more than a year later, in September 2008, Sernovitz and his wife had a baby boy born with familial dysautonomia, a rare recessive genetic disorder essentially found exclusively among Ashkenazi Jews.Read More


Test, and Then Test Again, Experts Advise

By Lauren F. Friedman

With additional mutations for genetic diseases continuing to be discovered among Ashkenazi Jews, genetic screening advocates are urging people to get tested for newly identified diseases, even if they have already been tested for other diseases.Read More


Accessibility vs. Expertise: Direct-to-Consumer Testing Sparks Debate

By Gabrielle Birkner

Drugstores stock tests that gauge blood sugar levels, predict ovulation, ascertain pregnancy and determine whether illegal drugs are in the bloodstream. And back in May, the Walgreens pharmacy chain announced that it would offer testing kits of another kind: ones intended to detect genetic diseases.Read More


$1.5 Million for Atlanta Screening

By Laurie Stern

A two-year pilot program that promotes genetic disease awareness and offers carrier screening will be introduced in Atlanta as a result of a $1.5 million grant from the Marcus Foundation, the philanthropy of Home Depot co-founder Bernard Marcus.Read More


Therapy Shows Promise in Trials for Hereditary Cancer Patients

By Karen Iris Tucker

An emerging therapy that attacks cancer cells continues to show promise, most recently in two international studies on women who have breast and ovarian cancer and are carriers of cancer-causing mutations particularly prevalent among Ashkenazi Jews.Read More





Find us on Facebook!
  • The gang's all here!
  • "Neither the 'blood feud' nor the 'honor killing' theory of Abu Khdeir's murder ever made sense — and their manufacture constituted a blood libel against all Palestinians." What do you think?
  • Why hasn't the Zionist Organization of American condemned the revenge killing of Mohammed Abu Khdeir?
  • Why recognize an independent Kurdistan now?
  • So. Many. Nazi. Jokes.
  • Once a symbol of peaceful cohabitation, the Jerusalem light rail is now a prime target for violence.
  • "My wife and I are observant Jews who are heartbroken about the fact that both of our children married non-Jews. My daughter married out first, and is now raising non-Jewish children and grandchildren and even celebrates Christmas. As for my son, he is more observant than my daughter, but still a few years ago I found out he was living with a non-Jewish woman for nine years. She is not a stable woman, emotionally or physically, and now she is pregnant and will not convert. I do not visit my children in their homes, but am pleasant when they visit us. My wife says I need to move on and welcome their partners in our home. So where to from here?"
  • These women have encountered unusual mikveh experiences and survived to tell the tale: "Among them are the adventurous vacationer who battles sharks and surfers to dunk in the freezing waters of the Indian Ocean, the mikveh attendant who is an aspiring opera star, and the late night mikveh goer who gets locked inside."
  • The revenge killing of Mohammed Abu Khdeir has shaken even those with strong notions about the Mideast. Cartoonist Eli Valley takes a look at one American Jew's crisis of confidence: http://jd.fo/d48ez
  • We caught up with Zach Braff about his new (and Jew-y) movie Wish I Was Here, his own Jewish upbringing and his bar mitzvah theme (Spoiler: Broadway musical theater.) Click on for an exclusive clip from the movie!
  • One set belonged to Noah Jacobson, singer for The Maccabeats, and another to David Malka, personal chef to the Lubavitcher rebbe!
  • You know you want to try these.
  • "What did you expect?"
  • "Fort Kent seemed at once a fairy tale and a tragedy: We were kings, but it didn’t work out." http://jd.fo/a42iC Josh Nathan-Kazis traveled to a tiny Maine town in search for his roots. He found the tale of Jake Etscovitz, the "Potato King," who built a Jewish life in the wilderness — and spent his life dressed for Fifth Ave.
  • Presented for your humble viewing: A video of Tom Hanks, dressed as a rabbi, singing “This Is How We Do It” — courtesy of Justin Bieber.
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.