Looking Back


Looking Back November 26, 2004

100 YEARS AGO• Mortimer L. Schiff, son of well-known Jewish banker Jacob Schiff, was arrested Sunday night for excessive speeding in a car on Fifth Avenue. Young Mortimer was furious that the arresting officer brought him down to the station and threatened to fix him good. Schiff also threatened the precinct’s sergeant in theRead More


November 19, 2004

100 YEARS AGO A strike has begun at the Cohen Brothers paper-box factory in New York City’s Bowery. The unusual thing about the 250 strikers is that most are young girls. In an obvious attempt to take advantage of their underage employees, the Cohen brothers, all religious Jews, paid them starvation wages. In addition, they created a fakeRead More


November 12, 2004

100 YEARS AGO Russian newspapers are looking for the root causes of the rash of pogroms that has occurred recently in the empire. The Russian journalists have concluded that the main reason for the pogroms is the wide availability of vodka. A short time ago, a number of small pogroms were perpetrated by groups of new army recruits as well as byRead More


November 5, 2004

100 YEARS AGO We are pleased to report that the strikes in progress at Kaplan and Markovitzs and Meyer and Shifrims sweatshops are going well. The bosses have had two strikers arrested in a failed attempt to break the rest of them. It is clear that eventually the bosses will have to settle with the courageous strikers. The bosses of the shopsRead More


October 29, 2004

100 YEARS AGO When Harlem resident Morris Stein walked into his apartment after work, he found two men stealing his belongings. When they saw him, the two men jumped out the window. Stein gave chase, yelling for the police along the way. A policeman managed to catch one of the thieves. When they arrived at the station, Stein sawRead More


October 22, 2004

100 YEARS AGO British-Jewish writer Israel Zangwill is currently in New York for the purpose of convincing wealthy Jews to support his plan to settle Jews in East Africa. England has practically promised a land mass of 400 square miles for the Jews to colonize, but this area is so untamed that only wild animals live there.Read More


October 15, 2004

100 Years Ago When Mrs. Cohen walked into Joseph Schwartz’s 125th Street tailor shop to have her purple dress cleaned, Schwartz told her it would cost $2 to make it “look like new.” When Mrs. Cohen returned the following day, she picked up the dress and put $1.50 on the counter. Schwartz immediately jumped up and blocked the door,Read More


October 8, 2004

100 YEARS AGO Abraham Shnodman, a 35-year-old resident of New York’s Suffolk Street, made a bet with one of his pals that he could drink l’chaim — an alcoholic toast — 18 times and still stand up on his own. The two headed to a saloon on Greene Street, where, after deciding that one drink was equal to three fingers of whiskey,Read More


October 1, 2004

100 YEARS AGO An army of lawyers has descended onto the Lower East Side to untie the tangled knot of complaints regarding who will receive recently deceased real estate magnate Jacob Cohen’s million-dollar estate. Esther Cohen, daughter of whom she calls the “original” Harris Cohen of Baxter Street, as well as second wife and secondRead More


September 17, 2004

100 YEARS AGO Rosa Rosenthal, whose husband managed to disappear after she gave birth, can’t find a job that will allow her to take her newborn with her. With no job, Rosenthal has no money to feed either herself or her baby. Not knowing what else to do, she took out an advertisement to sell her five-week-old girl for $200. Unfortunately for Rosenthal, there isn’t a big market for babies and there was little interest. One man came to take a look, but said that $200 was too much for the baby, especially since it was a girl. If had been a boy, perhaps he would have made an offer.Read More


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