Obituaries


Safire: Corned Beef And Counsel With A Stooped But Street-Smart Mentor

By David Kusnet

“I hope you have a notebook where you take down anecdotes,” William Safire told me the first time we met. I muttered something about how, on Bill Clinton’s speechwriting team, we had several researchers who compiled loose-leaf binders with stories about people who’d met the president, told him about their problems, or thanked him for proposing policies that would improve their lives.Read More


William Korey, Soviet Jewry Activist, 87

By Gal Beckerman

William Korey spent more than 30 years of his life deeply involved with the struggle to allow free emigration for Soviet Jews. But when I interviewed him in his Queens apartment a few years ago, he did not hide the fact that he never liked to work on individual cases. “There would be no end to it,” he told me.Read More


Velvl Yedidowich, 83, Editor of Russian Paper

By Sam Norich

When the Forward Association launched the weekly paper in 1995, it joined a crowded media market of two dozen Russian-language newspapers in the New York metro area alone and grew to be the third-largest in circulation. It was an outspoken Jewish voice in the Russian-speaking community, when only one other publication, the Lubavitch-affiliated paper, identified itself as Jews speaking to other Jews.Read More


Si Frumkin, 78, Soviet Jewry Activist

By JTA

Leading Soviet Jewry and human rights activist Si Frumkin has died. Frumkin, who founded the Southern California Council for Soviet Jews in 1968 and helped make it a mainstream American cause, died May 15 after battling cancer. He was 78.Read More


Wolpe’s Greatest Lessons as a Rabbi and Teacher Were Meant To Be Heard

By Stephen Fried

What we will miss most is his voice. It was muscular and musical, with an accent that sounded vaguely British at first, but later revealed itself to be all-American, with leftover “aahs” from Boston. When Gerald Wolpe died May 18 at the age of 81, American Jews lost one of our greatest sermonizers, one of our most fascinating and challenging pulpit leaders, and a renaissance rabbi whose dramatic life yielded several distinct acts, each with its own powerful teaching moments.Read More


Joseph Sherman, 65, Yiddish Scholar and Translator

By Lana Gersten

Joseph Sherman, a scholar and translator of Yiddish literature who is best known for Translating Isaac Bashevis Singer’s novel “Shadows on the Hudson,” died March 20. He was 65. The cause of death was complications from pancreatitis.Read More


William Davidson, 86, Philanthropist and Pistons Owner

By Lana Gersten

William Davidson, a businessman and Jewish philanthropist for whom the Jewish Theological Seminary’s graduate school of education is named, died Friday, March 13.Read More


William Davidson, 86, Philanthropist and Owner of Detroit Pistons, Dies

By Lana Gersten

William Davidson, a businessman and Jewish philanthropist for whom the Jewish Theological Seminary’s graduate school of education is named, died on Friday, March 13.Read More


Henry Tylbor, 79, Child Survivor of Ghetto Uprising

By Lana Gersten

Henry Tylbor, one of the youngest survivors of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising and a survivor of Auschwitz and Budzin, died February 24 of complications from Parkinson’s disease. He was 79.Read More


Ralph Kaplowitz, 89, Original Member of the Knicks

By Lana Gersten

Ralph Kaplowitz, an original member of the New York Knickerbockers who played in basketball’s first professional game in 1946, died at his home in the Floral Park section of Queens on February 2. He was 89.Read More





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