Yiddish


A New York Jewish Man Tries To Commit Suicide by Cocaine

By Eddy Portnoy

This week, 100 years ago, Jacob Haas took cocaine and tried to commit suicide because he couldn’t marry his niece. And, 75 years ago, details of Jewish life in Vienna under the Nazis were surfacing.Read More


The Yiddish Forverts Goes Biweekly in Print

By Josh Nathan-Kazis

Amid circulation and financial pressures, the print version of the Yiddish Forverts will soon appear only biweekly. But its website will relaunch as a daily with more content and new features.Read More


Looking Back: August 10, 2012

Has anybody seen Abie Levitt’s wife?Read More


Looking Back: July 20, 2012

After dozens of detectives searched high and low for Bronx resident Nathan Schwartz, the main suspect in the murder of 12-year-old Julia Connors, the suspect was found dead from gas asphyxiation in a room on Chrystie Street in Manhattan’s Lower East SideRead More


Looking Back: July 6, 2012

Annie Weiss, 16, was dragged before Magistrate Corrigan in Manhattan’s Centre Street Courthouse on the charge that she was the ringleader of a band of young thieves.Read More


Looking Back: June 29, 2011

A gang of Italians held a pogrom in Manhattan, on 114th Street between Fifth and Madison Avenues, during which two Jews were shot and grievously wounded.Read More


Looking Back: June 15, 2012

After Big Jack Zelig, a gangster from Manhattan’s Lower East Side, survived a recent shooting in a gang war between the Jewish gang headed by “Kid Twist” and the Italian gang led by Jack Sirocco, he took the stand to testify against his assailants.Read More


Old Call for Old Things

By Eliyana Adler

A beat-up truck comes trundling down a Jerusalem block to collect used household items. The elderly Palestinian driver cries out in Yiddish, ‘Alte zakhn!’ or ‘Old things.’Read More


Should Israel Have Gone With Yiddish?

By Philologos

Should Yiddish have been the national language of Israel? Philologos says emphatically ‘no,’ because Hebrew is the eternal language of the Jewish people.Read More


Looking Back: May 25, 2012

Twenty-five-year-old Brooklyn resident Rose Moscowitz shot and killed her husband, Morris Moscowitz, after he tried to force her to become a prostitute. Moscowitz was initially a packer at a cigar factory, and her wages weren’t enough for her husband. He told her that he wanted her to sell her body to other men, and when she refused, he beat her up. Her life became horribly bitter, and when she could take no more, she got a revolver and shot her husband in the heart.Read More





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