Yiddish


Looking Back: May 25, 2012

Twenty-five-year-old Brooklyn resident Rose Moscowitz shot and killed her husband, Morris Moscowitz, after he tried to force her to become a prostitute. Moscowitz was initially a packer at a cigar factory, and her wages weren’t enough for her husband. He told her that he wanted her to sell her body to other men, and when she refused, he beat her up. Her life became horribly bitter, and when she could take no more, she got a revolver and shot her husband in the heart.Read More


Looking Back: April 13, 2012

When Sarah Ehrlich arrived at her Bronx home, she heard a noise in the upstairs bedroom. Fully aware that no one in her family should have been home at the time, she realized that it must have been a burglar.Read More


Looking Back: March 30, 2012

Late on a Friday night, Jacob Goldstein was sitting in his Suffolk Street apartment on Manhattan’s Lower East Side when there was a knock at the door. Without thinking about it too much, Goldstein got up and answered it. When he opened the door, three men were standing there pointing revolvers at him. They pushed him back into the apartment and demanded everything he had. Goldstein complied. They took a gold watch and chain and all his cash before disappearing down the stairs. As soon as they left, Goldstein ran to the window and started yelling for help. A policeman happened to be nearby, and he managed to nab one of the crooks, whom Goldstein identified. The police officer began walking the thief to the stationhouse when a gang suddenly attacked him, beating him badly and freeing his prisoner.Read More


Looking Back: March 23, 2012

With dozens of detectives on the case, the police currently have no suspects and no clues about who threw a bomb into the home of Judge Otto Rosalsky.Read More


Looking Back: March 16, 2012

The horse-poisoning trial of cloak maker Jacob Cohen began before Judge Otto Rosalsky.Read More


Looking Back: March 9, 2012

When Celia Kuperstein saw smoke and flames pouring out of the windows of her Brooklyn apartment, she dashed inside to rescue her three children.Read More


Looking Back: February 24, 2012

A bloody war between rival gangs exploded on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Numerous shots were fired, bringing many residents onto the streets, where chaos reigned. Although many calls were placed to the police, the gangs had scattered by the time they arrived. Two gang members, 21-year-old Nathan Levi and 22-year-old George Lewis, both of whom live on Forsyth Street, were shot. The two men were taken to the hospital in critical condition, and neither was providing information about the shooters.Read More


The Most Famous English Jew

By Mikhail Krutikov

Was Sir Moses Haim Montefiore the first Jewish celebrity of the modern age? A strong affirmative is the thesis of Abigail Green’s “Moses Montefiore: Jewish Liberator, Imperial Hero,” a biography of the most famous Jew of the 19th century.Read More


Looking Back: February 3, 2012

A gang of suspected horse poisoners is believed to be behind the recent murder of blacksmith Louis Blumenthal.Read More


Looking Back: January 27, 2012

Leon Trotsky, in an interview with the editors of Der Veg, a Yiddish newspaper in Mexico City, said it saddens him that he never learned Yiddish, mostly because he wanted to be able to read the Yiddish press.Read More





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