Culture

Mandy Patinkin

On the hit series “Homeland,” Mandy Patinkin plays CIA Division Chief Saul Berenson, a father figure with a strong sense of ethics. The role has catapulted Patinkin back into the national spotlight, but it’s only the latest step in a career that has made the 60-year-old performer, who got his start singing in his temple choir in Chicago, into an acting legend.

Patinkin has repeatedly stood up for his ideals. “What is at the core of my Jewishness is forgiveness and passion for ourselves and for others and moving forward in a positive, familial way,” Patinkin said in a 2011 interview with the Forward. In 2005, he walked off the set of “Criminal Minds” because the content was too violent for his taste. “I would die talking before lifting a weapon,” he told Stephen Colbert last December, explaining his opposition to the Iraq war. For a rare moment, the quick-witted comedian was left speechless.

Patinkin’s professional success lends credibility to his decisions. In 1980, he won a Tony Award for his role as Che Guevara in the Broadway musical “Evita,” and in 1995, an Emmy Award for his starring role on “Chicago Hope.” His 1998 album of Yiddish songs, “Mamaloshen,” earned him an Echo Award (the equivalent of a German Grammy). In addition to his acting roles, Patinkin still gives concerts across the world.

In October, Showtime announced that it would renew “Homeland” for a fourth season. Whether on stage or on screen, there’s little doubt that Patinkin will keep bringing the passion for which he’s rightly celebrated.

The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.





Find us on Facebook!
  • What can we learn from tragedies like the rampage in suburban Kansas City? For one thing, we must keep our eyes on the real threats that we as Jews face.
  • When is a legume not necessarily a legume? Philologos has the answer.
  • "Sometime in my childhood, I realized that the Exodus wasn’t as remote or as faceless as I thought it was, because I knew a former slave. His name was Hersh Nemes, and he was my grandfather." Share this moving Passover essay!
  • Getting ready for Seder? Chag Sameach! http://jd.fo/q3LO2
  • "We are not so far removed from the tragedies of the past, and as Jews sit down to the Seder meal, this event is a teachable moment of how the hatred of Jews-as-Other is still alive and well. It is not realistic to be complacent."
  • Aperitif Cocktail, Tequila Shot, Tom Collins or Vodka Soda — Which son do you relate to?
  • Elvis craved bacon on tour. Michael Jackson craved matzo ball soup. We've got the recipe.
  • This is the face of hatred.
  • What could be wrong with a bunch of guys kicking back with a steak and a couple of beers and talking about the Seder? Try everything. #ManSeder
  • BREAKING: Smirking killer singled out Jews for death in suburban Kansas City rampage. 3 die in bloody rampage at JCC and retirement home.
  • Real exodus? For Mimi Minsky, it's screaming kids and demanding hubby on way down to Miami, not matzo in the desert.
  • The real heroines of Passover prep aren't even Jewish. But the holiday couldn't happen without them.
  • Is Handel’s ‘Messiah’ an anti-Semitic screed?
  • Meet the Master of the Matzo Ball.
  • Pierre Dulaine wants to do in his hometown of Jaffa what he did for kids in Manhattan: teach them to dance.
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.