News and Politics

Joachim Neugroschel, Prolific Multilingual Translator, Is Dead at 73

The prolific literary translator Joachim Neugroschel died on May 23 in Brooklyn, N.Y. He was 73. Neugroschel translated more than 200 books from Yiddish, French, German, Russia and Italian, including the work of Nobel Prize-winner Elias Canetti. His legal guardian and former partner, Aaron Mack Schloff, confirmed Neugroschel’s death.

Resignation Under Fire: Project director Jerzy Halbersztadt clashed repeatedly with museum board members over his vision for the institution he envisioned.

Polish Jewry Museum’s Creator Resigns Under Pressure

The recent departure under pressure of the creator and overseer of Warsaw’s Museum of the History of the Polish Jews is provoking concern about the future of the ambitious, large-scale project, which aims to preserve a legacy of 1,000 years of Jewish life in Poland.

Forgotten Hero: Rose Schneiderman (right) was one of the figures in the mural.

An Aunt’s Legacy Is Erased in Maine

As Annie Schneiderman Valliere drove south from her home in Woolwich, Maine, to the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire’s centennial commemoration in New York City, friends began calling her cell phone with disturbing news: Her aunt, activist Rose Schneiderman, was about to be scrubbed from Maine’s labor history.

A Grave Marker Unveiled for Six Triangle Fire Victims Who Had Been Unknowns

A grave marker inscribed with the names of the six victims of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire who were only recently identified was unveiled April 5 in Evergreen Cemetery in Brooklyn. The six were buried as unknowns 100 years ago, and later a large monument was dedicated to them at the cemetery. The new stone marker, placed in front of the monument, declares the site to be the final resting place of Max Florin, Concetta Prestifilippo, Fannie Rosen, Dora Evans, Josephine Cammarata and Maria Lauletti.

Learning Her Mother's Legacy

In September 1909, Clara Lemlich, a young woman from Ukraine, stood up in front of a crowded auditorium in New York City’s Cooper Union. After listening to lengthy speeches by union leaders who urged caution, Lemlich said that the poor pay and unsafe working conditions could go on no longer, and she called for a strike. Her words inspired the Uprising of the 20,000, a walkout that halted work in many of New York City’s garment factories.

Remembrance: Marchers in Lower Manhattan carry shirtwaists emblazoned with the names of those who died in the Triangle fire to mark its 100th anniversary.

One Person’s Quest To Find and Restore The Graves of the Triangle Fire’s Victims

Scattered among 16 cemeteries around New York they came to rest, the 146 people whose lives were violently cut short 100 years ago in one of the nation’s worst industrial disasters — the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire.

Remember: Relatives of Triangle Fire victims march through Lower Manhattan to commemorate blaze?s 100th anniversary while holding up shirtwaists with names of those who died.

Triangle Fire Victims’ Families Gather To Affirm Ongoing Legacy

It was a family reunion of sorts — just 100 years after the fact. As soon as the march and speeches were over, and the names of all 146 victims of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire had been read aloud, family members of those who died and those who survived the March 25, 1911, blaze headed to a restaurant to break bread together, courtesy of the Triangle Families Association.

Thousands Mark Fire’s Centennial at Triangle Site

U. S. Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis said she did not hesitate a minute when she was asked last year to be a keynote speaker at today’s 100th anniversary commemoration of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire.

Family Secret: My Mother-in-Law, the Accused Spy

On Saturday, February 26, my mother-in-law, Judith Socolov, died peacefully in her sleep at age 89. Her death was covered extensively by The Associated Press and The New York Times, and reporters openly discussed her “infamous” past as part of a Cold War drama that had long been forgotten.

Lonely Fighter: Union chief Bruce Raynor.

Union That Grew in the Triangle Fire’s Ashes Is Now Nearly Gone

By the time the union was done with J.P. Stevens and Co., the boycott of the giant textile manufacturer had so penetrated the culture that the wives of Stevens executives, heading off to cocktail parties, would warn their husbands not to tell anyone where they worked.