How Impeachment Works

Impeachment is in the air. Usually, it is a process reserved for delinquent presidents. Currently, the “i” word is also being invoked against Vice President Dick Cheney.

The popular notion is that “impeachment “ means removal. But it doesn’t. Impeachment is only the first step in a more extended process. Here’s the way the U.S. Constitution puts it:

There is no special provision for cases involving the Vice President. The current push to impeach Vice President Cheney is, to our knowledge, without precedent.

According to the Constitution, removal of the president or vice president does not necessarily end the process:

The entire process is further complicated by a factor probably unknown to our founding fathers; namely, the filibuster.

None of the above is intended to discourage those who are busily conducting all kinds of spectacular events to impeach either the president or the vice president or both.

The above is just a reminder than “impeachment” is just the beginning of a tough tricky task. Lotsa luck!

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How Impeachment Works

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