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Israeli Prosecutor Says Israel Not To Blame for Rachel Corrie’s Death

The State Prosecutor’s Office appealed Thursday to the Haifa District Court to dismiss outright the civil suit filed by U.S. activist Rachel Corrie’s family against the Defense Ministry for unspecified compensation for their daughter’s death.

Corrie was 24 when she was struck and killed in 2003 by an Israel Defense Forces bulldozer as she and other activists tried to stop Israel razing homes in Rafah by using their bodies as human shields.

The driver said he did not see her, and the Israel Defense Forces has ruled her death an accident – a version her parents reject.

“The driver of the bulldozer and his commander had a very limited field of vision, such that they had no possibility of seeing Ms. Corrie,” the Prosecutor’s office said in a statement, adding that the incident was considered “a military action in the course of war” which exempts the state from responsibility for it.

The statement also said that “Rachel Corrie was injured as a result of her prohibited action, for which she is solely responsible, due to her considerable negligence and lack of caution.”

At Wednesday’s opening of the civil case, the Corries’ lawyer demanded a new investigation into her death, to which the States Prosecutor responded: “The IDF thoroughly investigated the incident, including a Military Police investigation, in the framework of which considerable evidence was collected.”

“The bulldozer driver and commander were investigated by the Military Police and the unequivocal conclusion was reached that they did not see ? and could not have seen – Ms. Corrie due to the bulldozer’s limited field of vision,” the statement added.

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