Skip To Content
JEWISH. INDEPENDENT. NONPROFIT.
Breaking News

Yehuda Lev, Journalist and Zionist, Dies at 86

Yehuda Lev, an iconoclastic journalist and veteran of World War II and Israel’s War of Independence who established a European underground route to smuggle Holocaust survivors to Palestine, has died.

Lev died Aug. 3 in Providence, Rhode Island, after a prolonged illness. He was 86.

Lev became the first associate editor of the newly founded Jewish Journal of Greater Los Angeles in 1986, continuing until 1993. He was best known for his column “A Majority of One,” which slayed the Jewish community’s sacred cows week after week.

Lev was born in New York City and raised in Forest Hills, N.Y. as John Lewis Low, the son of a successful businessman and a mother noted as one of the first women labor lawyers.

He dropped out of Cornell University to enlist in the U.S. Army during the latter part of World War II and was discharged in Germany when the war ended.

Moved by the plight of Holocaust survivors languishing in Displaced Persons camps, Lev established a route, mostly by foot, to bring the DPs to Mediterranean ports, where they embarked on “illegal” ships, past the British naval blockade, into Palestine.

Returning to the United States, Lev earned master’s degrees from the University of Chicago in political science/Arabic studies and Stanford University in communication arts.

He set off in 1947 to Palestine to help the Jews in their struggle to establish an independent state. Changing his name to Yehuda Lev, he joined the Israeli army when war broke out in May 1948.

While on patrol in the Negev, Lev’s jeep was blown up by a landmine, which killed everyone else and shattered his feet.

Lev remained in Israel at the end of the war and established himself as a highly popular radio host of “Jerusalem Calling,” a daily one-hour variety and discussion show in English on Kol Israel, the country’s national network.

Later, as the only native English speaker at Kol Israel, Lev became the network’s voice in reporting the trial of Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann to the outside world.

In Los Angeles, Lev resumed his writing career on Jewish newspapers and a self-published broadsheet, also titled “A Majority of One.”

He moved to Providence, Rhode Island in 1993, when his wife Rosa Maria (Shoshana) Pegueros took up a professorship in history and women’s studies at the University of Rhode Island.

A message from our editor-in-chief Jodi Rudoren

We're building on 127 years of independent journalism to help you develop deeper connections to what it means to be Jewish today.

With so much at stake for the Jewish people right now — war, rising antisemitism, a high-stakes U.S. presidential election — American Jews depend on the Forward's perspective, integrity and courage.

—  Jodi Rudoren, Editor-in-Chief 

Join our mission to tell the Jewish story fully and fairly.

Republish This Story

Please read before republishing

We’re happy to make this story available to republish for free, unless it originated with JTA, Haaretz or another publication (as indicated on the article) and as long as you follow our guidelines. You must credit the Forward, retain our pixel and preserve our canonical link in Google search.  See our full guidelines for more information, and this guide for detail about canonical URLs.

To republish, copy the HTML by clicking on the yellow button to the right; it includes our tracking pixel, all paragraph styles and hyperlinks, the author byline and credit to the Forward. It does not include images; to avoid copyright violations, you must add them manually, following our guidelines. Please email us at [email protected], subject line “republish,” with any questions or to let us know what stories you’re picking up.

We don't support Internet Explorer

Please use Chrome, Safari, Firefox, or Edge to view this site.