5 Glorious Ways to Make Shakshuka

Shakshuka: the ultimate breakfast, the fast and easy lunch, and the surprisingly perfect dinner. If you ever need something comforting and appetizing at any time of the day then this dish of baked eggs in tomato sauce is it!

Now let’s shake it up, Shakshuka in Hebrew means a “Shake Up”.

Traditional shakshuka starts with a base of tomatoes and peppers. Add feta cheese, add fancy spices, add eggplant, olives, zucchini or any other vegetables you have in your fridge. Cook it down and your eggs, but keep them runny if you can.

Experiment and shake it up. You’ll never complain that you have nothing to eat again! It’s time to sharpen your shakshuka skills with these 5 different Shakshuka recipes that you can whip up any night of the week!



The Master Shakshuka

Get back to basics with this barebones base of a shakshuka: the granddaddy of all shakshuka recipes. Use it as your stepping stone and eat it like it is… or get creative.

The Green Shakshuka

Got greens? No need to cram your kale and other dark greens into a smoothie. Instead, throw them into a pan and cook them with your shakshuka. Healthy, satisfying and you’ve got your greens in the most delicious way possible!

The Cheesy Shakshuka

If you’re feeling fancy, then this is it. A little halloumi cheese goes a long way. Simply toss it into your shakshuka, and let it melt and enjoy the oozy texture which also adds that little extra tang.

The Meaty Shakshuka

Can’t imagine a hearty dinner without meat? No problem, just add a little lamb to your shaky shakshuka and you’re all set! Oh, and throw in a little Swiss chard to give it a healthy kick.

The ‘Shrooms Shakshuka

Shakshuka with portabello mushrooms will steal your heart. These humongous portabellos are an awesome canvas for a hearty dinner and especially perfect to slather the shakshuka over.

How do you spice up your Shakshuka?

This story "5 Glorious Ways to Make Shakshuka" was written by Joy of Kosher with Jamie Geller.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Forward.

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