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1 / 13 The Building That Started It All

770 Eastern Parkway (Chabad Lubavitch World Headquarters) Photo by Getty Images

2 / 13 A Detail From 770

A view onto Eastern Parkway through a stained glass window at Chabad headquarters. Photo by Andrew Silverstein

3 / 13 A Holy Place

Rabbis prepare to pose a group photo, part of the annual International Conference of Chabad-Lubavitch Emissaries, in front of Chabad Lubavitch World Headquarters Nov. 19, 2017 in Crown Heights. Photo by Getty Images

4 / 13 Deep in the Heart of Texas

Rabbis stand before a 770-inspired Chabad Center in El Paso, Texas, designed by architect Eli Meltzer. Photo by El Paso Chabad

5 / 13 Faithful Copy

The Kfar Chabad near Tel Aviv duplicates the original design brick-by-brick inside and out. Photo by Robbins/Becher

6 / 13 On Pico Boulevard

The Los Angeles Chabad headquarters Photo by Robbins/Becher

7 / 13 Rutgers Rendition

This replica of 770 gains space by repeating the front façade. Photo by Robbins/Becher

8 / 13 Our Neighbors to the North

Camp Gan Israel, near Montreal, Canada Photo by Robbins/Becher

9 / 13 Standing Out in a Crowd.

A 770 replica in Sao Paulo, Brazil Photo by Robbins/Becher

10 / 13 A Part of the Big Apple in B.A.

A tall, skinny 770 replica in Buenos Aires. Photo by Robbins/Becher

11 / 13 Conforming to Local Design Standards

In 2019, the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera, reported locals called Milan’s 770 “l’olandese,” the Dutchman, associating the look with Amsterdam. Photo by Robbins/Becher

12 / 13 In the Land Down Under

770 in Melbourne, Australia Photo by Robbins/Becher

13 / 13 Inauspicious Beginnings

In the mid 1930s, a Jewish medical doctor, S. Robert Kahn, commissioned the respected architect Edwin Kline to build him a private residence and clinic on Eastern Parkway, then home to affluent assimilated Jews. Photo by Andrew Silverstein

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