Israeli Virtuoso Benjamin Giltburg Wins Piano Contest Despite Shocking Freeze

After Blackout, Continued To Awe Judges With Mozart

Piano Man: Virtuoso Boris Giltburg vowed to shun competitions from now on after his stunning memory lapse in the middle of a performance. Judges over looked his stumble.
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Piano Man: Virtuoso Boris Giltburg vowed to shun competitions from now on after his stunning memory lapse in the middle of a performance. Judges over looked his stumble.

By Reuters

Published June 24, 2013.
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Competitions are for horses, not for artists was the verdict of the great Hungarian composer and pianist Bela Bartok.

And there is a part of Israeli pianist Boris Giltburg, declared winner on June 1 of one of the world’s most prestigious and gruelling music contests, that agrees.

He won Belgium’s Queen Elisabeth Competition in spite of a memory lapse that froze him as he performed Mozart in the semi-finals. His mother and grandmother, both pianists, left the concert hall, unable to listen any longer and convinced it was all over, as was Giltburg.

“What I most wanted to do was crawl away, but I knew I couldn’t. It’s a feeling of utter hopelessness,” he told Reuters, relaxing at last over chocolate dessert in a Brussels brasserie.

After the performance, he forced himself to play back the recording and discovered, contrary to his expectations, he had not actually stopped.

His right hand had continued to play “something”, he said. But the revelation, was that, after the blackout, he recovered, his playing improved, his muscles relaxed and Mozart flowed.

Still, he was incredulous that he was selected for the finals - and the next ordeal in the form of a week of confinement in Waterloo, near Brussels.

In the “Chapelle musicale” (literally musical chapel), built for the purpose, the 12 finalists, denied all access to the outside world, had to learn a fiendishly difficult new work by French composer Michel Petrossian, as well as rehearsing their chosen performance pieces - in Giltburg’s case a Beethoven sonata and a Rachmaninov concerto.

To add to the hot-house atmosphere, in which everyone was acutely aware of everyone else’s talent, Petrossian’s piece was 16 minutes long, compared with the average of about 10 minutes for the surprise work handed to the contestants at this stage.

That meant 50 percent more highly complex music to learn.

Torn between anger and despair, Giltburg, who has just turned 29, said it was one of the toughest weeks of his life so far and the anger has not subsided.

“I’m a bit angry at the world for not having come up with another way of discovering talent other than competitions,” he said.


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