Who Are the Rogues, and Who Are Not?

By Gus Tyler

Published August 22, 2003, issue of August 22, 2003.
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The United States is suspending military aid to 35 countries because they refuse to grant immunity to American citizens under the International Criminal Code. The basis for this unusual action is a provision of our anti-terrorism law that calls upon our government to withhold all military aid to any country that joined the International Criminal Court but did not grant an exemption for American personnel.

The obvious question is why, if America gets an exemption, should not other countries also get the same? The implied answer is not that we are good folk who can be trusted but that other nations are “rogues” who cannot be trusted.

Indeed, these rogues may actually use the court to pounce on Uncle Sam. Here’s the way Lincoln P. Bloomfield Jr., assistant secretary of state for political military affairs, put it: “It is our concern that there could be politically motivated charges against American citizens.”

In other words, some “rogue” states could gang up on us and use the court to go after American citizens.

As we puzzled over this daunting dilemma, it occurred to us to consult a lifelong friend.* “Who,” we asked, “are the rogues, and who are not?” He said he could help with a few words stated in the majestic style of this poignant poem.

Please tell us now who is a rogue

At least the ones right now in vogue.

The faithless false-faced phony French

With whom we once did share a trench?

Those haughty, bumbling, fumbling Brits

Because they say that Blair’s the pits?

Or can it be the Czechs or Slavs

Because we treat them like they’re slobs?

Or could it be Korea North,

Whose bomb we say may not come forth?

Perhaps it is Arabia

That has a different savior.

Or maybe it is China red

Who won’t lay down and play it’s dead.

Or even our dear Mexico

Who now unto our call says, “No”

And don’t forget our foe Iran

Who once our favorite shah did ban.

They all emit a stinking scent

We won’t give them a single cent.

We’ll save those many bucks and then

We’ll cut the taxes once again.

* Please note that this columnist’s lifelong friend is a bit of a “rogue” himself. His name is “Alter Ego.”






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