Skip To Content
JEWISH. INDEPENDENT. NONPROFIT.
Culture

CONTRASTING LANDSCAPES

Known for his bold brushstrokes and vibrant colors, Michael Kovner creates paintings that offer lush images of Israeli scenery. An expansive beach dotted with red umbrellas, piles of yellow haystacks casting moody shadows in the sunlight and a blunt portrait of a lemon tree ripe with fruit are among his subjects. In Kovner’s new exhibition, The Mountain and the Sea, currently on display at the George Krevsky Gallery, the artist presents 24 works that contrast the Israeli landscape with renderings of the natural surroundings of Sausalito, Calif.

Son of Israeli poet and political activist Abba Kovner, the artist grew up on Kibbutz Ein-Ha Chonesh and served in an HQ Reconnaissance Patrol Unit with Benjamin Netanyahu and Ehud Barak. Kovner’s artistic style was highly influenced by his work with helicopters.

“Often I saw the earth from a bird’s eye view, while at the same time I watched the earth closely, walking hills and wadis. I developed dual feelings for the land… one more objective, involving structure and form, the other responding to details and movement,” Kovner said in a 2003 interview with Deidre Stein Greben of ARTnews.

In 1970, when he was discharged from the army, Kovner came to New York City, where he studied at the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting, and Sculpture. His work with teachers Philip Guston, Jack Tworkov and Steven Sloman influenced him highly.

Kovner’s paintings have been shown extensively throughout the United States and Israel, including solo exhibitions at the Bineth Gallery in Tel Aviv; The Israeli Museum, Jerusalem, and the Ann Loeb Bronfman Gallery in Washington, D.C.

George Krevsky Gallery, 77 Geary St., San Francisco; May 4-June 17; Tue.-Sat. 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; free. (415-397-9748 or www.georgekrevskygallery.com)

I hope you appreciated this article. Before you go, I’d like to ask you to please support the Forward’s award-winning, nonprofit journalism during this critical time.

Now more than ever, American Jews need independent news they can trust, with reporting driven by truth, not ideology. We serve you, not any ideological agenda.

At a time when other newsrooms are closing or cutting back, the Forward has removed its paywall and invested additional resources to report on the ground from Israel and around the U.S. on the impact of the war, rising antisemitism and the protests on college campuses.

Readers like you make it all possible. Support our work by becoming a Forward Member and connect with our journalism and your community.

Make a gift of any size and become a Forward member today. You’ll support our mission to tell the American Jewish story fully and fairly. 

— Rachel Fishman Feddersen, Publisher and CEO

Join our mission to tell the Jewish story fully and fairly.

Republish This Story

Please read before republishing

We’re happy to make this story available to republish for free, unless it originated with JTA, Haaretz or another publication (as indicated on the article) and as long as you follow our guidelines. You must credit the Forward, retain our pixel and preserve our canonical link in Google search.  See our full guidelines for more information, and this guide for detail about canonical URLs.

To republish, copy the HTML by clicking on the yellow button to the right; it includes our tracking pixel, all paragraph styles and hyperlinks, the author byline and credit to the Forward. It does not include images; to avoid copyright violations, you must add them manually, following our guidelines. Please email us at [email protected], subject line “republish,” with any questions or to let us know what stories you’re picking up.

We don't support Internet Explorer

Please use Chrome, Safari, Firefox, or Edge to view this site.