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France Suffering ‘Intifada,’ Jewish Lawmaker Says After Fatal Stabbing In Paris

(JTA) – Following the stabbing of five people in central Paris by a man who shouted about Allah, a French-Jewish lawmaker said France was experiencing a “knife intifada.”

One victim died from a wound to the neck and two were severely wounded in the attack Saturday near the Paris Opera, which French authorities are treating as a terrorist attack, Le Monde reported. The assailant, a man in his twenties, was killed by police. His name was not immediately released for publication by authorities. The remaining two victims were lightly wounded, the paper reported.

“Knife intifada in the center of Paris, at Opera,” Meyer Habib, a member of the National Assembly, the French parliament, wrote on Twitter. Habib, a former vice president of the CRIF umbrella group of French Jewish communities, expressed his condolences to the surviving victims and their families and expressed his appreciation for police’s rapid response.

“It’s time to finish off radical Islam. It’s them or us,” Habib wrote on Twitter.

Intifada, Arabic for uprising, is the name Palestinians have given their struggle against Israel, which features many terrorist attacks against civilians.

Since 2012, hundreds of people have died in a series of terrorist attacks across France featuring explosives, firearms and vehicular ramming.

French President Emmanuel Macron also expressed sorrow over the incident at the Paris Opera and thanked police, adding: “We will cede nothing to the enemies of liberty.”

The assailant, whose victims have not yet been named, shouted “Allah hu akbar” before stabbing them. The Arabic-language phrase means “Allah is the greatest.”

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