Skip To Content
JEWISH. INDEPENDENT. NONPROFIT.
Breaking News

Pamela Geller Anti-Islam Bus Ads Coming to Philadelphia

(Reuters) — An ad campaign featuring an image of Adolf Hitler and linking Islam to Nazism could soon appear on Philadelphia-area buses after a court ruling this week that forces the regional transit authority to accept the campaign.

The ad’s sponsor, political blogger Pamela Geller, said on Friday she was pleased by a ruling by Philadelphia District Court Judge Mitchell Goldberg that a rejection of the ads would violate her First Amendment right of free speech.

“Jew-haters have been running anti-Semitic and anti-Israel ads on buses for years. We are responding,” she said in an email.

Geller is the founder of the American Freedom Defense Initiative, which the Southern Poverty Law Center lists as an anti-Muslim hate group.

The advertisement, which has already run in the transit systems of other U.S. cities, reads: “Islamic Jew-Hatred: It’s in the Quran.”

It contains a picture of the Nazi dictator meeting with a Palestinian Arab nationalist and Muslim leader in the 1920s and 1930s. The caption reads: “Adolf Hitler and his staunch ally, the leader of the Muslim world, Haj Amin al-Husseini.”

Ibrahim Hooper, a spokesman for Council on American-Islamic Relations, said Geller may have a constitutional right to “be a bigot” but her “intolerance” was harmful.

“People of good will just need to get together and marginalize her type of anti-Muslim hatred,” he said.

Southeastern Pennsylvania Transit Authority is still trying to decide whether to appeal the ruling, said spokeswoman Jerri Williams.

She said the agency thought the ad may offend some customers, and Geller’s organization was unwilling to make changes to satisfy the transit agency’s reservations.

Geller said her organization spent $750,000 to run similar ads in New York, Boston, Chicago, Miami and Washington – and in San Francisco, where the city’s transit system ran its own ads to counter the blogger’s message. The Philadelphia campaign would cost $100,000, she said.

I hope you appreciated this article. Before you go, I’d like to ask you to please support the Forward’s award-winning, nonprofit journalism during this critical time.

Now more than ever, American Jews need independent news they can trust, with reporting driven by truth, not ideology. We serve you, not any ideological agenda.

At a time when other newsrooms are closing or cutting back, the Forward has removed its paywall and invested additional resources to report on the ground from Israel and around the U.S. on the impact of the war, rising antisemitism and the protests on college campuses.

Readers like you make it all possible. Support our work by becoming a Forward Member and connect with our journalism and your community.

Make a gift of any size and become a Forward member today. You’ll support our mission to tell the American Jewish story fully and fairly. 

— Rachel Fishman Feddersen, Publisher and CEO

Join our mission to tell the Jewish story fully and fairly.

Republish This Story

Please read before republishing

We’re happy to make this story available to republish for free, unless it originated with JTA, Haaretz or another publication (as indicated on the article) and as long as you follow our guidelines. You must credit the Forward, retain our pixel and preserve our canonical link in Google search.  See our full guidelines for more information, and this guide for detail about canonical URLs.

To republish, copy the HTML by clicking on the yellow button to the right; it includes our tracking pixel, all paragraph styles and hyperlinks, the author byline and credit to the Forward. It does not include images; to avoid copyright violations, you must add them manually, following our guidelines. Please email us at [email protected], subject line “republish,” with any questions or to let us know what stories you’re picking up.

We don't support Internet Explorer

Please use Chrome, Safari, Firefox, or Edge to view this site.