Family Time: A Holiday Gift Guide

By Lana Gersten

Published December 11, 2008, issue of December 19, 2008.
  • Print
  • Share Share

This year, Christmas falls right in the middle of Hanukkah, which means that for the duration of the holiday, most kids will be free from school, eating latkes and jelly donuts. With more time to spend with relatives, here are three Hanukkah gift ideas that the whole family can enjoy.


For kids who can’t get enough of arts and crafts, Rivky Koenig’s “Crafting Jewish: Fun Holiday Crafts and Party Ideas for the Whole Family” (Mesorah Publications, $29.99) is an ideal choice. The book features innovative art projects for children and adults, as well as simple holiday food recipes. In easy-to-follow instructions, aspiring artists can make clay dreidel charm jewelry, glowing glass menorahs, challah covers and Lucite mezuzahs.


Get the kids in the kitchen with “Jewish Holiday Cooking: Festive Meals for Celebrating the Years” (DK Publishing, $19.99), by Jill Colella Bloomfield. Perfect for the novice cook, this tome provides easy holiday recipes and includes information on why certain foods are important to Jewish culture. If you’re looking for an activity to do with your child, or simply looking for a painless turkey kreplach recipe, this is a great gift.


Israeli artist Laura Cowan has created two new space-age Hanukkah gifts: the Smart and Saturn dreidels. For those who can never remember how to play the game, the Smart Dreidel ($80) is a brilliant option — the disk and cone design features the rules, written in colorful print, on the top of the toy. The Saturn Dreidel ($160) will appeal to those with minimalist sensibilities, its sleek form inspired by the rings of the planet for which it’s named. Both are made from anodized aluminum and available at www.lauracowan.com.


The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.





Find us on Facebook!
  • When is a legume not necessarily a legume? Philologos has the answer.
  • "Sometime in my childhood, I realized that the Exodus wasn’t as remote or as faceless as I thought it was, because I knew a former slave. His name was Hersh Nemes, and he was my grandfather." Share this moving Passover essay!
  • Getting ready for Seder? Chag Sameach! http://jd.fo/q3LO2
  • "We are not so far removed from the tragedies of the past, and as Jews sit down to the Seder meal, this event is a teachable moment of how the hatred of Jews-as-Other is still alive and well. It is not realistic to be complacent."
  • Aperitif Cocktail, Tequila Shot, Tom Collins or Vodka Soda — Which son do you relate to?
  • Elvis craved bacon on tour. Michael Jackson craved matzo ball soup. We've got the recipe.
  • This is the face of hatred.
  • What could be wrong with a bunch of guys kicking back with a steak and a couple of beers and talking about the Seder? Try everything. #ManSeder
  • BREAKING: Smirking killer singled out Jews for death in suburban Kansas City rampage. 3 die in bloody rampage at JCC and retirement home.
  • Real exodus? For Mimi Minsky, it's screaming kids and demanding hubby on way down to Miami, not matzo in the desert.
  • The real heroines of Passover prep aren't even Jewish. But the holiday couldn't happen without them.
  • Is Handel’s ‘Messiah’ an anti-Semitic screed?
  • Meet the Master of the Matzo Ball.
  • Pierre Dulaine wants to do in his hometown of Jaffa what he did for kids in Manhattan: teach them to dance.
  • "The first time I met Mick Jagger, I said, 'Those are the tackiest shoes I’ve ever seen.'” Jewish music journalist Lisa Robinson remembers the glory days of rock in her new book, "There Goes Gravity."
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.