Land of Milk, Honey and Reality TV

'3' Shows Israel Can Be Fertile Ground for Television

Looking for Love: Rachel Harley, April Francis and Libby Lopez star in the new CBS reality series, ‘3.’
Sonja Flemming/CBS
Looking for Love: Rachel Harley, April Francis and Libby Lopez star in the new CBS reality series, ‘3.’

By Curt Schleier

Published July 24, 2012, issue of July 27, 2012.
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Gordon heard about the idea for the program in late 2009 from Rick Rosen, his agent. Rosen heads the TV department of WME Entertainment, the Hollywood talent agency that grew out of the merger between the William Morris and Endeavor agencies. Rosen (who also brought the idea for “In Treatment” to HBO) and WME also represent Keshet, the Israeli television network on which the show originated. On a business trip to Israel earlier that year, Rosen had lunch with Avi Nir, Keshet’s CEO. Nir told him about the series, which had not yet aired, and how it grew out of the kidnapping of soldier Gilad Shalit, held captive for more than five years by Hamas. Rosen liked the idea.

“We were fighting in the Middle East,” Rosen said. “I could see an American being captured and coming back to his family. The show is about family and issues of government intrigue and terrorism.”

Rosen brought the idea to Gordon and to Alex Gans, who had worked with Gordon on the Fox thriller “24.” He told them, “I found your next series.” The pair met with Nir. “They all got along,” Rosen said. “Avi had complete trust in them, and they made the series their own.”

It was “completely relatable,” Gordon observed. “What made [“Homeland”] relevant to us — and what we hoped would make it relevant for an American audience — was the notion of a veteran returning from war. Our military involvement in Afghanistan and in Iraq [was a decade old], and we realized that the character of a returned veteran really wasn’t on the air anywhere.”

The result was an immediate hit and what is likely to be a passel of Emmy nominations this fall. For the show’s second season, Showtime approved three weeks of shooting in Israel, where the Americans worked with members of the original Israeli crew. “I don’t think we’ll be the last American TV show to film there,” noted David Nevins, Showtime’s entertainment president. “Both Jerusalem and Tel Aviv are making pretty aggressive plays to become production centers.”

Now CBS is hoping that lightning will strike again and that Americans will also have an affinity for Israeli reality programming. The idea for “3” began when Tassler led a Women in Entertainment Mission to Israel last year for the Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles. There she met with Nir, who took out his iPad and showed her clips from “3.”

“I loved the show,” Tassler said. “We were looking to get into the dating world with an unscripted show, but wanted something with a strong emotional narrative and almost a documentary feel to it. What I responded to was that these women all had worldviews, and what we were following was not just about dating, but also the developing friendship between the three women.”

But is America ready for a reality program about women who don’t overturn restaurant tables and throw their fists? Other than “In Treatment” and “Homeland,” none of the other Israeli imports has been renewed after the first season. There have also been several Israeli-bred shows that reached the development and pilot stages but did not make it to the air. These include “Pillars of Smoke,” a murder mystery on NBC; “Life Isn’t Everything,” a so-called divorce sitcom on CBS; “The Naked Truth” a police procedural on HBO and “Joey Dakota,” a time travel musical, on The CW.

Do the failures outweigh the successes? Not, perhaps, in television. Rosen feels that judging Israeli content on the basis of a handful of shows is an oversimplification. “I don’t think that has anything to do with Israel,” he said. “What’s the success rate of any new series, 20%? That a show doesn’t work isn’t an issue of nationality.”

“There are so many factors,” he added. “That a show makes the schedule, that’s an enormous amount of success right there.”

Curt Schleier is a freelance writer who teaches business writing to corporate executives.


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