Where's the Justice for American Settler Killed by Palestinian Stone-Throwers?

FBI Hasn't Prosecuted Anyone for Deaths in West Bank

Solemn Moment: Jewish settlers gather for funeral of Asher Palmer and his son, Yonathan, whose car was hit by stone-throwing Palestinians on the occupied West Bank in 2011.
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Solemn Moment: Jewish settlers gather for funeral of Asher Palmer and his son, Yonathan, whose car was hit by stone-throwing Palestinians on the occupied West Bank in 2011.

By Michael Palmer

Published April 04, 2013, issue of April 12, 2013.
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Two FBI special agents sat across from me in a conference room at the J. Edgar Hoover Building, in Washington. It was late October last year, shortly after Sukkot. We were discussing the deaths of my son Asher Palmer, and my grandson Yonatan Palmer, who were murdered on a Friday afternoon, September 23, 2011.

That day, Asher had strapped Yonatan into his car seat and headed to his in-laws in Jerusalem, where he expected to spend the Sabbath with his wife. Soon after they left, Asher drove onto a two-lane highway just outside the West Bank settlement of Kiryat Arba; a taxicab sped toward him, its rear window rolled down. The cab swerved close to Asher’s lane, and a football-size rock was thrown from the back seat, crashing through his windshield. Asher’s car veered off the road and rolled over. The cab sped off.

We can’t know Asher’s reactions at that moment. The police found no skid marks on the road, and theorized that the stone had knocked Asher unconscious, leaving him unable to brake or to control his car. Asher was just shy of his 25th birthday. Yonatan was nearly 1 year old. Both were declared dead by the first responders.

Wa’al al-Arjeh drove the cab. Ali Saadeh threw the rock. Al-Arjeh later said that he had worked for the security and intelligence forces of the Palestinian Authority for nearly 10 years. Saadeh was responsible for a number of other attacks against Jews.

On October 4, 2011, Israeli security forces arrested Saadeh, al-Arjeh and three of their accomplices, who confessed to the attack. A fourth member of al-Arjeh’s gang was arrested several days later. A series of trials followed, with al-Arjeh convicted of murder in early April, and Saadeh now awaiting his own verdict.

Asher was an American citizen. The United States Department of Justice therefore was supposed to have responded immediately to the murders with its own set of prescribed actions: assigning an FBI rapid deployment team to the region, opening an FBI investigation and establishing a joint task force with the Department of State.

American law makes overseas attacks on Americans the DOJ’s highest priority.

Not one action, I learned, had been taken for Asher. Not even a preliminary inquiry. So 13 months had passed since the murders (now 18 months), and I was sitting in an FBI office, trying to understand why. The FBI agents explained: They preferred to open “value added” investigations.

Mine, however, was not an isolated complaint. To date, the United States has not prosecuted a single Palestinian for attacking an American in Israel or in a P.A.-controlled location, but in the past two decades alone, as many as 143 Americans have been killed or badly injured. Were all of these cases also deemed unworthy?


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