Jewish Artist Who Once Called Chagall's Art 'Crappy' Finally Gets His Due

Retrospective and New Book Focus On Sam Szafran

A Feeling of Vertigo: Stairways are prominently featured in the work of the French Jewish artist Sam Szafran.
Courtesy of Gianadda Foundation
A Feeling of Vertigo: Stairways are prominently featured in the work of the French Jewish artist Sam Szafran.

By Benjamin Ivry

Published June 28, 2013, issue of June 28, 2013.
  • Print
  • Share Share
  • Single Page

The French Jewish painter Sam Szafran is the subject of an exhibit, “Sam Szafran, 50 Years of Painting,” at the Pierre Gianadda Foundation in Martigny, Switzerland, and a new book, “Sam Szafran: Entretiens avec Alain Veinstein” (“Sam Szafran, Conversations With Alain Veinstein”), that sheds further light on the artist’s inspirations.

Born Samuel Berger in Paris in 1934 to a family of Polish Jewish origin, in the 1960s, the artist began to sign his pastels and other artworks Szafran, adopting his mother’s maiden name in tribute to her family. Szafran is noted for his multiple obsessional images of stairways that swerve dynamically in the style of the 1920s British Vorticist movement of painting, co-founded by the painter and writer Wyndham Lewis. Another quintessential Szafran subject is an interior where a sitter is overwhelmed by vast, all-engulfing plant foliage. Szafran’s paintings express dynamically a sense of anxiety, teetering on being overwhelmed. This is perhaps to be expected, given the artist’s wartime experiences, during which his father, uncles and aunts were all murdered in concentration camps.

In 1942, as a boy, Szafran escaped from the notorious Vel’ d’Hiv police roundup, in which French gendarmes cooperated with Nazi policies to deport and exterminate Jews. Szafran claimed to be the son of a building employee at the Vélodrome d’Hiver (literally, the winter bicycle track), where thousands of Jews were imprisoned, and fled detainment. Hiding in southern France during the rest of the Occupation, Szafran was arrested in 1944 and was imprisoned briefly in the Drancy internment camp before American troops liberated it.

In the new book, Szafran tells Veinstein — a French poet, novelist and radio interviewer, that his works reflect a “kind of intellectual ghetto translated into images.” The artist’s grandparents lived in Polish ghettos, and Szafran himself was born in Le Marais, the Jewish ghetto in Paris. The claustrophobic nature of his stairway scenes derives from the artist’s impression that “there is no exit.” Their “inextricable” aspect is more important than any feeling of vertigo they might produce.” To their creator, the stairways signify “endless waiting. The stairway represents waiting because it’s a spiral that leads you from one floor to another, which lowers you from one floor to another, bit by bit….”

Sometimes Szfran juxtaposes stairways with glimpses of his studio, where boxes of brilliant pastels are splayed open invitingly as if symbolizing the prospect of creative toil. This temporarily interrupts anguish and preoccupations. Although not a student of Judaica, Szafran has for decades incarnated the Babylonian Talmud’s injunctions about industriousness, such as, “Great is labor for it honors the workman.”

More recent works depict Lilette Szafran, the painter’s wife, seated amid palm trees and other hothouse plants. The quasi-suffocating foliage is like the backdrop of a hermetically sealed winter garden, in this case protecting the artist and his beloved by shutting out not just the grim and gritty Paris suburb of Malakoff where they have lived since the 1970s, but also indelibly tragic family memories. These extended into postwar Paris, where Szafran lived for a time as a homeless heroin addict and often hampered his career with his rude behavior toward denizens of the Paris art world.


The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.





Find us on Facebook!
  • "It’s the smell that hits me first — musty, almost sweet, emanating from the green felt that cradles each piece of silver cutlery in its own place." Only one week left to submit! Tell us the story of your family's Jewish heirloom.
  • Mazel tov to Chelsea Clinton and Marc Mezvinsky!
  • If it's true, it's pretty terrifying news.
  • “My mom went to cook at the White House and all I got was this tiny piece of leftover raspberry ganache."
  • Planning on catching "Fading Gigolo" this weekend? Read our review.
  • A new initiative will spend $300 million a year towards strengthening Israel's relationship with the Diaspora. http://jd.fo/q3Iaj Is this money spent wisely?
  • Lusia Horowitz left pre-state Israel to fight fascism in Spain — and wound up being captured by the Nazis and sent to die at Auschwitz. Share her remarkable story — told in her letters.
  • Vered Guttman doesn't usually get nervous about cooking for 20 people, even for Passover. But last night was a bit different. She was cooking for the Obamas at the White House Seder.
  • A grumpy Jewish grandfather is wary of his granddaughter's celebrating Easter with the in-laws. But the Seesaw says it might just make her appreciate Judaism more. What do you think?
  • “Twist and Shout.” “Under the Boardwalk.” “Brown-Eyed Girl.” What do these great songs have in common? A forgotten Jewish songwriter. We tracked him down.
  • What can we learn from tragedies like the rampage in suburban Kansas City? For one thing, we must keep our eyes on the real threats that we as Jews face.
  • When is a legume not necessarily a legume? Philologos has the answer.
  • "Sometime in my childhood, I realized that the Exodus wasn’t as remote or as faceless as I thought it was, because I knew a former slave. His name was Hersh Nemes, and he was my grandfather." Share this moving Passover essay!
  • Getting ready for Seder? Chag Sameach! http://jd.fo/q3LO2
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.