Heyday of Farrar, Straus & Giroux Made Publishing House Seem Like 'Mad Men'

Boris Kachka's 'Hothouse' Revisits Profession's Heyday

Kachka Him If You Can: Boris Kachka offers a compulsively readable tale of the creation, triumphs and tribulations of the legendary publishing house Farrar, Straus & GIroux.
Mia Tran
Kachka Him If You Can: Boris Kachka offers a compulsively readable tale of the creation, triumphs and tribulations of the legendary publishing house Farrar, Straus & GIroux.

By Julia M. Klein

Published August 15, 2013, issue of August 23, 2013.
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● Hothouse: The Art of Survival and the Survival of Art at America’s Most Celebrated Publishing House, Farrar, Straus & Giroux
By Boris Kachka
Simon & Schuster, 448 pages, $28

Descended from the influential Straus and Guggenheim families, Roger W. Straus Jr. bestrode the publishing company he co-founded in 1946 with “a sui generis blend of vulgarity and refinement.” So writes Boris Kachka in “Hothouse,” his compulsively readable tale of the creation, triumphs and tribulations of Farrar, Straus & Giroux.

Straus emerges as a hugely magnetic and rakish personality, with enough charisma to have his way with potential lovers and aspiring authors alike. A rich man, he lived large, but he kept FSG’s headquarters ramshackle, and used the publishing house’s growing prestige to pay lower advances for writers.

Working alongside John Farrar, Straus exhibited sufficient business acumen to keep FSG independent through the industry’s many 20th-century convulsions before finally selling a majority interest to Germany’s Georg von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group in 1993 for $30 million.

“He was fond of letting a suitor buy him lunch,” Kachka writes, “before returning to the office, calling in a few editors, and gossiping viciously about the bastard. ‘I had a marvelous lunch,’ he’d say. ‘I lied to him and he lied to me.’”

In 1955 he hired the more reticent and dignified Robert Giroux, a renowned editor with impeccable literary taste. Both Catholic and discreetly gay, Giroux was the confidant of such writers as T.S. Eliot, Robert Lowell, Bernard Malamud, John Berryman and Flannery O’Connor. “FSG really became itself around the time Giroux was made partner” in 1964, Kachka writes.

FSG championed European and Latin American novelists, poets, and Catholic and Jewish writers. Its authors, from Isaac Bashevis Singer and Joseph Brodsky to Tom Wolfe and Jonathan Franzen, transformed the house into a literary Olympus, publishing the works of Nobel Prize-winners. Kachka, a contributing editor to New York magazine, skillfully tells the story of the charmed partnership between Straus and Giroux, along with their many talented associates. He names names (and nicknames) and gives numbers (the stingy advances grew over time). Re-creating the literary culture of midcentury Manhattan, Kachka describes how overlapping friendships and interests drove writers to embrace FSG and the patina of highbrow celebrity it conferred.

“Their company exploited a glorious middle place — geographically, culturally and historically,” Kachka writes. “Overlooking Union Square, FSG had one foot in Knopf’s midtown, another in Grove Press’s Greenwich Village, and both arms reaching out to Europe.”

Kachka himself combines a fluid, often elegant prose style with mass-market instincts. (It’s notable that his book is published not by FSG, but by its more commercial adversary, Simon & Schuster, toward whom Straus was both rivalrous and disparaging.) By plumbing the FSG archives — sanitized, Kachka notes, but still productively detailed — and interviewing an impressive number of FSG employees and authors, past and present, he delivers a scintillat-ing potpourri of literary and sexual gossip.

Kachka’s key sources include Straus’s son, Roger “Rog” Straus III, who worked on and off in FSG’s marketing department and is astonishingly candid about his father’s professional and personal foibles. He also persuades the writer and onetime FSG editor David Rieff, Susan Sontag’s son, to describe his mother’s passionate friendship and later feud with Straus.


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