'Quenelle' Soccer Star Nicolas Anelka Escapes Punishment by British League — So Far

Troubling Silence Over 'Nazi' Goal Celebration

Controversial Salute: Nicolas Anelka, center, celebrates a goal. He later flashed the ‘quenelle,’ a gesture reminiscent of the Nazi salute.
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Controversial Salute: Nicolas Anelka, center, celebrates a goal. He later flashed the ‘quenelle,’ a gesture reminiscent of the Nazi salute.

By Cnaan Liphshiz

Published January 14, 2014.
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“Not good enough,” John Mann, the chair of the Inter-Parliamentary Coalition for Combating Anti-Semitism at the European Parliament, tweeted last month. “You should be leading on challenging this racism. Your statement is weak and puny.”

The rebuke was unusual for an eminent body like Kick It Out, which has 20 years of experience in combating racism and conducts training programs for similar groups around the world. Leaders of the Israeli version, Kick Racism out of Israeli Football, were in England last year for five days of anti-hooliganism training with Kick It Out.

Since Dieudonne introduced the quenelle last year, hundreds have posted online photographs of themselves performing the gesture, which consists of pointing toward the ground with a flattened hand while folding the other arm across the chest.

Several photos showed people performing the quenelle near Jewish sites, including synagogues, Holocaust monuments and the school in Toulouse, France, where four Jews were murdered in 2012.

On Jan. 9, the 70th anniversary of the deportation of hundreds of Jews from Bordeaux to Nazi death camps, more than a dozen people participated in a group quenelle outside the city’s main synagogue.

At least 10 other prominent French athletes have performed the quenelle in recent months. One was Alexy Bosetti, who performed the gesture for cameras and then said on Twitter he was only showing off his tattoo. Bosetti ended his tweet with an emoticon depicting a wink.

Despite complaints by Jewish groups, the quenelle appears to be immune from prosecution under French laws prohibiting the display of Nazi symbols. Such legal fuzziness is a Dieudonne trademark. He coined the word “shoananas” — a mash-up of the Hebrew word for Holocaust and the French word for pineapple — to suggest the Holocaust is a myth without breaking laws against genocide denial.

Nevertheless, French officials have taken a hard line against the quenelle in recent weeks. Interior Minister Manuel Valls said the gesture was an inverted Nazi salute and an expression of anti-Semitic hatred. He also urged cities to ban performances by Dieudonne, leading to the cancellation of the comedian’s nationwide tour that was due to begin this month.

“The quenelle may be a complicated legal matter, but it’s a very clear moral issue,” said Shimon Samuels, the Simon Wiesenthal Center’s international affairs director. He called on the Football Association to condemn it, “and especially on Kick It Out, which are not a court of law.”

The European Jewish Congress called for Anelka’s suspension as punishment and said the association’s inaction is indicative of a bigger problem in European and British soccer.

“Kick It Out’s tame response puts into question its commitment to tackling anti-Semitism in football and, sadly, reflects a common lack of reaction from the whole European football community,” Raya Kalenova, the executive vice-president of the European Jewish Congress, told JTA.

“Where is the apology from player or club? Where is the condemnation, ban or suspension from the Football Association, UEFA or FIFA? Kicking out racism and anti-Semitism requires a lot more than holding up banners.”


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