'Kosher' Chicken Sold on 'Holy' Lower East Side Was Really Treyf

Italian Jews Convert En Masse Amid Fascism

Outside Moscow: The writers Bessie Beatty (left) and Helen Auger with Mrs. Kalinin (behind the driver) and Rafael Rubinstein (far right) on a sled. As titular head of Soviet Russia, Kalinin needed financial guidance and Rubenstein was Kalinin’s tax expert.
Forward Association
Outside Moscow: The writers Bessie Beatty (left) and Helen Auger with Mrs. Kalinin (behind the driver) and Rafael Rubinstein (far right) on a sled. As titular head of Soviet Russia, Kalinin needed financial guidance and Rubenstein was Kalinin’s tax expert.

By Eddy Portnoy

Published February 15, 2014, issue of February 21, 2014.
  • Print
  • Share Share

1913 •100 years ago

Treyf Chicken Sold as Kosher

“About strikes you’re willing to write, but about my slaughtered chicken with the treyf neck, you won’t write? What kind of paper are you? Where is your sense of justice?” It was with these words that Brooklyn resident Rokhl Beinisohn berated the editors of the Forverts. Beinisohn, who had come from Brooklyn to buy a kosher chicken on “holy” Ludlow Street in Manhattan, arrived at home to discover that the chicken she bought never went under the knife. It didn’t even have a mark on its neck. Furious, she took it to a Brooklyn rabbi, who confirmed that it was treyf, or not kosher. She returned to Ludlow Street to chew out the butcher who sold it to her, but she got into a fight with him. This resulted in a struggle over the chicken, which broke in two, the butcher getting the body and Beinisohn the head and neck. She brought the neck right over to our office. We’re not rabbis, but it does look like she wound up with a treyf chicken.

1938 •75 years ago

Wave of Conversion in Italy

Italian Jews are experiencing a massive wave of conversion to Christianity, an attempt on their part to improve the lives of their children under fascist rule. Jewish communal leaders are worried about the startling number of these conversions, particularly in Trieste and outside the large cities, where Jewish communities are small and weak. Many parents are having their children converted, since the only education currently available is through the church. Among those who have recently converted are Senior Pio Toliachosa, the former president of Rome’s Jewish community and one of the community’s most prominent figures. The Jewish community is attempting to organize and stand against what might be the disappearance of Italian Jewry through conversion, and it is looking to the Jews of other countries for help.

1963 •50 years ago

Tough Times for Algerian Jews

A delegation of Algerian Jews arrived in Paris. This is the first time since Algeria gained its independence that such a visit has been made. A dozen years ago, Algeria had a Jewish population of about 130,000, most of whom left after the country became sovereign. There are some 5000 Jews who remained. The five Algerian communal leaders met with their French counterparts and gave them a report on the conditions of the country’s Jews. Economically, they are doing very poorly. It was noted, however, that they were not suffering from anti-Semitism. Jews are free to practice their religion and to organize their communities, as well as to send their children to Hebrew schools. The majority of them live in Algiers and Oran, though there are significant numbers in Colomb-Bechar and in the Sahara Desert region.


The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.





Find us on Facebook!
  • According to Israeli professor Mordechai Kedar, “the only thing that can deter terrorists, like those who kidnapped the children and killed them, is the knowledge that their sister or their mother will be raped."
  • Why does ultra-Orthodox group Agudath Israel of America receive its largest donation from the majority owners of Walmart? Find out here: http://jd.fo/q4XfI
  • Woody Allen on the situation in #Gaza: It's “a terrible, tragic thing. Innocent lives are lost left and right, and it’s a horrible situation that eventually has to right itself.”
  • "Mark your calendars: It was on Sunday, July 20, that the momentum turned against Israel." J.J. Goldberg's latest analysis on Israel's ground operation in Gaza:
  • What do you think?
  • "To everyone who is reading this article and saying, “Yes, but… Hamas,” I would ask you to just stop with the “buts.” Take a single moment and allow yourself to feel this tremendous loss. Lay down your arms and grieve for the children of Gaza."
  • Professor Dan Markel, 41 years old, was found shot and killed in his Tallahassee home on Friday. Jay Michaelson can't explain the death, just grieve for it.
  • Employees complained that the food they received to end the daily fast during the holy month of Ramadan was not enough (no non-kosher food is allowed in the plant). The next day, they were dismissed.
  • Why are peace activists getting beat up in Tel Aviv? http://jd.fo/s4YsG
  • Backstreet's...not back.
  • Before there was 'Homeland,' there was 'Prisoners of War.' And before there was Claire Danes, there was Adi Ezroni. Share this with 'Homeland' fans!
  • BREAKING: Was an Israeli soldier just kidnapped in Gaza? Hamas' military wing says yes.
  • What's a "telegenically dead" Palestinian?
  • 13 Israeli soldiers die in Gaza — the deadliest day for the IDF in decades. So much for 'precision' strikes and easy exit strategies.
  • What do a Southern staple like okra and an Israeli favorite like tahini have in common? New Orleans chef Alon Shaya brings sabra tastes to the Big Easy.
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.