J Street on the Docket

Will Left-Leaning Israel Lobby Be Let Into the Tent?

Uphill Fight: J Street president Jeremy Ben-Ami came under attack at a committee meeting of the Conference of Presidents of Major Jewish Organizations.
j street
Uphill Fight: J Street president Jeremy Ben-Ami came under attack at a committee meeting of the Conference of Presidents of Major Jewish Organizations.

By Theodore Sasson

Published April 27, 2014, issue of May 02, 2014.
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On April 30, the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations will vote on J Street’s application for admission. It will be a significant moment not just for the left-leaning lobby, but also for the Jewish establishment as a whole, which will have to provide a verdict on whether the communal tent should include an organization that has publicly opposed the policies of the current Israeli government.

The 51-member Presidents Conference includes the larger religious, advocacy, service, fraternal and fundraising organizations. Newly established groups like J Street must wait five years before applying to join, and a vote of two-thirds of the membership is required for acceptance. The fraternity Alpha Epsilon Pi was admitted earlier this year as the newest member.

Established in the mid-1950s, the Presidents Conference has as its central purpose the job of conveying the consensus view of American Jewish organizations to the White House and the State Department. “Dissent ought not and should not be made public,” the organization’s 1978 annual report explained, as “the result is to give aid and comfort to the enemy and weaken that Jewish unity which is essential for the security of Israel.” During its first quarter-century, the Presidents Conference achieved unity mostly by adopting the positions of Israel’s various governments.

But in 1993, following the announcement of the Oslo Accords, the organization became mired in conflict. Right-wing groups led by the Zionist Organization of America joined Israeli opposition parties in challenging the peace deal. Chastised by the American Israel Public Affairs Committee for breaking ranks, the ZOA’s newly elected national president, Morton Klein, declared that “in the absence of a consensus in the community, individual groups should be free to pursue their own strategies.”

Twelve years later, stymied by right-wing dissent, the Presidents Conference was one of the few Jewish organizations that dragged its heels before expressing support for Israel’s disengagement from Gaza.

Perhaps to avoid further paralysis, longtime Executive Vice Chairman Malcolm Hoenlein no longer brings contentious issues to a vote. Instead, Presidents Conference statements are issued in the name of the organization’s leaders and signed by Hoenlein and by the organization’s lay chairman, Robert G. Sugarman. There is no pretense of representing all the member organizations, which now span the ideological spectrum from American Friends of Likud to Americans for Peace Now.

In this context, the vote on J Street’s application for membership will not much affect the balance of power within the Presidents Conference or the organization’s ability to reach decisions by consensus.


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