FLASH FRAMES

By Adam Stern

Published October 28, 2005, issue of October 28, 2005.
  • Print
  • Share Share

Vladimir Jabotinsky may be best known as the father of Revisionist Zionism and as the author of the essay “The Iron Wall: We and the Arabs,” but he also was a novelist who is known for his Zionist re-fashioning of the biblical hero Samson. Written in Russian, “The Five: A Novel of Jewish Life in Turn-of-the Century Odessa” (Cornell University Press) is his second novel. It tells the story of a Jewish family living in fin-de-siècle Odessa. Michael R. Katz, professor of Russian studies at Middlebury College, undertook the English translation, the first rendition of the novel in any Western language.

* * *

As the title suggests, “Walking the Bible: A Photographic Journey” (William Morrow) traces the footsteps of the biblical narrative. From the banks of the Tigris and Euphrates to the Nabatean ruins at Petra, Bruce Feiler documents the modern-day equivalents of biblical sites through photographs, personal reflections and historical anecdotes.

* * *

Alice Mattison’s “In Case We’re Separated: Connected Stories” (William Morrow) is a collection of short stories that chronicle the generations of a Jewish American family in the 20th century. Set in 1954, the title story centers on Bobbie Kaplowitz, a Brooklyn widow who finds herself struggling to decide whether to answer the call of marriage or that of the Sunbeam Mixmaster.

* * *

Kazimierz Sakowicz’s diary, edited and introduced by Yad Vashem’s former chairman Yitzhak Arad as “The Ponary Diary, July 1941-November 1943: A Bystander’s Account of a Mass Murder” (Yale University Press), is a firsthand account of the mass murders that took place in Ponary, Lithuania, starting in 1941. Some of the entries are longer and more elaborate observations, but most are short, unemotional descriptions of the events that Sakowicz witnessed. On Tuesday, October 13, 1942, he writes: “Two cars. They brought old Jews and shot them.” The simplicity of the prose is perhaps the book’s most poignant aspect.






Find us on Facebook!
  • What can we learn from tragedies like the rampage in suburban Kansas City? For one thing, we must keep our eyes on the real threats that we as Jews face.
  • When is a legume not necessarily a legume? Philologos has the answer.
  • "Sometime in my childhood, I realized that the Exodus wasn’t as remote or as faceless as I thought it was, because I knew a former slave. His name was Hersh Nemes, and he was my grandfather." Share this moving Passover essay!
  • Getting ready for Seder? Chag Sameach! http://jd.fo/q3LO2
  • "We are not so far removed from the tragedies of the past, and as Jews sit down to the Seder meal, this event is a teachable moment of how the hatred of Jews-as-Other is still alive and well. It is not realistic to be complacent."
  • Aperitif Cocktail, Tequila Shot, Tom Collins or Vodka Soda — Which son do you relate to?
  • Elvis craved bacon on tour. Michael Jackson craved matzo ball soup. We've got the recipe.
  • This is the face of hatred.
  • What could be wrong with a bunch of guys kicking back with a steak and a couple of beers and talking about the Seder? Try everything. #ManSeder
  • BREAKING: Smirking killer singled out Jews for death in suburban Kansas City rampage. 3 die in bloody rampage at JCC and retirement home.
  • Real exodus? For Mimi Minsky, it's screaming kids and demanding hubby on way down to Miami, not matzo in the desert.
  • The real heroines of Passover prep aren't even Jewish. But the holiday couldn't happen without them.
  • Is Handel’s ‘Messiah’ an anti-Semitic screed?
  • Meet the Master of the Matzo Ball.
  • Pierre Dulaine wants to do in his hometown of Jaffa what he did for kids in Manhattan: teach them to dance.
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.