Shul Resists Eviction by Charter School

The 18 men praying together early on a recent Friday morning, wrapped in tefillin and tallitot, didn’t exactly look like squatters. Their Orthodox synagogue, in the Mill Basin section of Brooklyn, also seemed fairly permanent. A hulking, wooden ark sat against one wall. Bookshelves filled with religious texts covered another. A blue velvet clothwith the embroidered name of the congregation, Machzikei Torah, lay on top of a dais dominating the room.

Irving Kristol, a Broker of Ideas Who Helped Create a Movement

There has been a flurry of obituaries and appreciations of Irving Kristol in recent days. And rightly so. Whether you admire his conservative ideas or loathe them, his mark on American politics is undeniable. He was, simply put, a key architect of the conservative revolution of the 1970s and 1980s that altered the Republican Party, and with it the American political landscape.

A Final Yom Kippur in the Delta for Mississippi Community Begun in 1830s

As the members of Temple Beth El in Lexington, Miss., pray this Yom Kippur for inclusion in the Book of Life, they’ll be attending a funeral of sorts. The Ne’ilah, the day’s traditional closing service, will be the last scheduled worship to be held in their 104-year-old white wooden synagogue.

Self-Reflection Comes to Broadway

‘Ten Days. Ten Questions,” is the philosophy behind a creative campaign called that is posing introspective questions to Jews and non-Jews alike in a most unusual spot.

Home Is Where the Hat Is

A little short of green this Sukkot? Do rising sukkah construction costs have you down? Maybe you don’t have the space for a sukkah. Or due to a total lack of engineering skills, your shaky chateau is just not happening.

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