The Sins We Have Sinned

It’s not clear how it happened, but somehow Yom Kippur seems to have been canceled this year. The public is duly warned.

That’s right: Jews are not permitted this year to find fault in themselves or to repent of any wrongdoing. We have done nothing wrong. It’s official. All our troubles are somebody else’s fault.

True, the liturgy of the holy day of atonement has yet to catch up with this new reality. The Yom Kippur service still takes the outmoded view that we have acted wrongly as a community and ought to repent and atone as a community. It says that we — collectively — have sinned, acted treacherously, stolen, spoken slander, acted perversely, wrought wickedness and a whole lot more.

Obviously, however, all this may be dismissed as antisemitic libel. We are sorry for nothing.

For the sin we have sinned willingly or because we had no choice.

For the sin we have sinned by hardening our hearts.

For the sin we have sinned without knowing it.

For the sin we have sinned by loose speech.

For the sin we have sinned by sexual abuse.

For the sin we have sinned openly or in secret.

For the sin we have sinned by intentional deceit.

For the sin we have sinned by insult or incitement.

For the sin we have sinned by defrauding our neighbors.

For the sin we have sinned by conniving.

For the sin we have sinned by exploitation.

For the sin we have sinned by contempt for the wise.

For the sin we have sinned by violence.

To all these we reply: lies. The whole world is against us. It’s not our fault. Besides, they deserved it.

We at the Forward wish all our readers a meaningful holiday, an easy fast and a clear eye to look within. And to all those we have offended or wronged: We ask your forgiveness.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Forward.
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The Sins We Have Sinned

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