News


Agency Raps Chief Rabbinate Over Conversion Policy

By Noga Tarnopolsky

JERUSALEM — The Jewish Agency for Israel, the quasi-governmental body that oversees immigration to Israel, is investigating claims that the Israeli Chief Rabbinate is unduly blocking thousands of Russians from converting to Judaism.At their board of governors meeting last week, leaders of the Jewish Agency for Israel voted toRead More


Nation’s Ills Await ‘Deus ex Machina’

By Chemi Shalev

JERUSALEM — Israeli policy-makers are growing increasingly nervous about the Bush administration’s mounting diplomatic difficulties — at NATO, in Turkey and at the United Nations Security Council — and the increasing likelihood of a delay in the launch of an American campaign against Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.Israel’s top political,Read More


French Minister Unveils Plan to Fight Antisemitism

By Marc Perelman

PARIS — When the French education minister warned that antisemitism had become a “true danger” in French schools and last week announced a series of measures to tackle the issue, Jews here rejoiced that someone high up finally was listening to their complaints.The center-right government, after committing to crack down on violent antisemiticRead More


Foe of Gay Ban Won’t Head Conservative Panel

By Alana Newhouse

On the eve of what was expected to be his first session as chairman of Conservative Judaism’s supreme lawmaking body, it was announced that Rabbi Elliott Dorff, an outspoken supporter of overturning the movement’s ban on ordaining homosexuals, will not assume the position.The move came on the heels of a request by the head of theRead More


Backing Israel on Terror, Bush Preps Postwar Push For a Settlement Freeze

By Ori Nir

WASHINGTON — The Bush administration has accepted Israel’s position that the Palestinian Authority must take action against terrorism and implement substantial reforms before Israel is required to begin implementing the internationally sponsored “road map” to Israeli-Palestinian peace, including a freeze on settlement activity.At theRead More


Experts Say Saddam Interview Showed Iraqi’s New Eloquence

By Ori Nir

WASHINGTON — Given Saddam Hussein’s penchant for rambling in interviews and tendency to appear dazzled by the luster of his own flowery Arabic, longtime observers of the Iraqi dictator have come to not expect much in the way of eloquence from him.That is why they were so surprised and impressed with Saddam’s sit-down last week with CBSRead More


In Crowded Field, Candidates Are Scrambling for Big Donors

By E.J. Kessler

As the race for the 2004 Democratic presidential nomination gains momentum, the nine declared candidates in the field are in an unusually tough scramble for the backing of wealthy donors who fuel the nation’s campaign apparatus.But this year’s Democratic campaign is not like other years’ campaigns. Given the size of the field, candidates areRead More


Top Charities Spar Over Turf

By Nacha Cattan

Two of the most powerful Jewish charities in North America are trading accusations of undercutting each other’s efforts.The United Jewish Communities, the roof body of North American Jewish federations, complained in a February 28 letter that one of its primary overseas partners, the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, is underminingRead More


Rabbi’s Heirs Sue For Music Rights

By Nacha Cattan

The late Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach was masterful with a guitar and had a sweet way with words. But the late “singing rabbi” hit a flat note when it came to paperwork: The chasidic maestro rarely penned contracts, licenses or copyrights — and never composed a will.As a result, a multimillion-dollar global music industry flourishes inRead More


Ranting Poet’s Visit Makes For a Disturbing Week at Yale

By James Kirchick

As Yale Daily News columnist Eli Muller put it last Friday, “It has been an unpleasant week to be Jewish at Yale.”The trouble started when the university’s Afro-American Cultural Center decided to host controversial poet Amiri Baraka for a reading and discussion of his poem, “Somebody Blew Up America.” In that now infamous work, the poetRead More





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  • "I’ve never bought illegal drugs, but I imagine a small-time drug deal to feel a bit like buying hummus underground in Brooklyn."
  • We try to show things that get less exposed to the public here. We don’t look to document things that are nice or that people would like. We don’t try to show this place as a beautiful place.”
  • A new Gallup poll shows that only 25% of Americans under 35 support the war in #Gaza. Does this statistic worry you?
  • “You will stomp us into the dirt,” is how her mother responded to Anya Ulinich’s new tragicomic graphic novel. Paul Berger has a more open view of ‘Lena Finkle’s Magic Barrel." What do you think?
  • PHOTOS: Hundreds of protesters marched through lower Manhattan yesterday demanding an end to American support for Israel’s operation in #Gaza.
  • Does #Hamas have to lose for there to be peace? Read the latest analysis by J.J. Goldberg.
  • This is what the rockets over Israel and Gaza look like from space:
  • "Israel should not let captives languish or corpses rot. It should do everything in its power to recover people and bodies. Jewish law places a premium on pidyon shvuyim, “the redemption of captives,” and proper burial. But not when the price will lead to more death and more kidnappings." Do you agree?
  • Slate.com's Allison Benedikt wrote that Taglit-Birthright Israel is partly to blame for the death of American IDF volunteer Max Steinberg. This is why she's wrong:
  • Israeli soldiers want you to buy them socks. And snacks. And backpacks. And underwear. And pizza. So claim dozens of fundraising campaigns launched by American Jewish and Israeli charities since the start of the current wave of crisis and conflict in Israel and Gaza.
  • The sign reads: “Dogs are allowed in this establishment but Zionists are not under any circumstances.”
  • Is Twitter Israel's new worst enemy?
  • More than 50 former Israeli soldiers have refused to serve in the current ground operation in #Gaza.
  • "My wife and I are both half-Jewish. Both of us very much felt and feel American first and Jewish second. We are currently debating whether we should send our daughter to a Jewish pre-K and kindergarten program or to a public one. Pros? Give her a Jewish community and identity that she could build on throughout her life. Cons? Costs a lot of money; She will enter school with the idea that being Jewish makes her different somehow instead of something that you do after or in addition to regular school. Maybe a Shabbat sing-along would be enough?"
  • Undeterred by the conflict, 24 Jews participated in the first ever Jewish National Fund— JDate singles trip to Israel. Translation: Jews age 30 to 45 travelled to Israel to get it on in the sun, with a side of hummus.
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