Bringing the Lower East Side to Life by the Forward

Bringing the Lower East Side to Life

Earlier this week, Chris Moriarty wrote about writing her new book and songs of hope and failure. Her blog posts are being featured this week on The Arty Semite courtesy of the Jewish Book Council and My Jewish Learning’s Author Blog Series. For more information on the series, please visit:

Bringing the Lower East Side to Life by the ForwardBringing the Lower East Side to Life by the Forward

One of my main goals in writing “The Inquisitor’s Apprentice” was to bring the Lower East Side to life for my own kids and make it a place they’d want to visit and learn more about. And what brings the past to life better than food,music, and theater?

Of course there’s a plethora of great books about every aspect of life on the Lower East Side. But here — as cultural comfort food for the soul — are my favorite books about food, klezmer, and Yiddish theater.

The best book bar none about food on the Lower East Side is Jane Ziegelman’s “97 Orchard: An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement.” Ziegleman turns bare bones menus into a comprehensive account of how immigrant families worked, shopped, ate, and lived on the Lower East Side. Her portraits of the five families are sensitive, beautifully written, and at times deeply moving. And the book is packed to the gills with gems of forgotten culinary history. Such as the fact that shmaltz was mostly made with goose fat until the 1930s, when Jewish gangsters began to run illegal chicken farming operations near the East River. Who knew?

There are a number of excellent books about klezmer, but my favorite is Henry Sapoznik’s “Klezmer! Jewish Music from Old World to Our World.” As someone who grew up in folksinging circles where people bragged about having known Bobby Zimmerman “back when” or made out in the back seat of a car with Pete Seeger (true story, seriously), I really enjoyed the way Sapoznik blends the history of klezmer with a firsthand account of the klezmer revival and its ties to the larger folk music scene.

Stefan Kanfer’s “Stardust Lost: the Triumph, Tragedy and Meshugas of the Yiddish Theater in America” might just be my favorite nonfiction book of the last decade. There is a charm to this book which is difficult to describe. Sure, Kanfer has great material to work with: the glamour of Thomashevsky, the star power of David Kessler, the terrible irony of Yiddish theater reaching its apex as an art form just as the gates to Ellis Island were slamming shut.

But Kanfer brings a light touch to his material, and a prose style that combines humor and tragedy almost as deftly as the great artists he writes about. “Stardust Lost” is one of the very few nonfiction books that I’ve actually reread just for the sheer fun of it.

Nahma Sandrow’s much heftier ” Vagabond Stars: A World History of Yiddish Theater” is less of an introduction to Yiddish theater than a sumptuous banquet for those who already know and love it. She chronicles major and minor figures, covering material that might only get a cursory mention in more general histories. Her writing is scholarly yet highly readable. And the book is a treasury of delicious stories about the flamboyant lives and scandalous loves of Yiddish theater’s famous and not-so-famous. If there are any Yiddish theater fans on your Hanukkah list, this is a book they’ll want to curl up with on a cold winter evening.


Chris Moriarty’s most recent book, “The Inquisitor’s Apprentice,” is now available.


The Jewish Book Council is a not-for-profit organization devoted to the reading, writing and publishing of Jewish literature. For more Jewish literary blog posts, reviews of Jewish books and book club resources, and to learn about awards and conferences, please visit www.jewishbookcouncil.org.

MyJewishLearning.com is the leading transdenominational website of Jewish information and education. Visit My Jewish Learning for thousands of articles on Judaism,Jewish holidays,Jewish history and more.

Bringing the Lower East Side to Life

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