Alan Dershowitz Trashes O.J. Simpson Glove Claim

Rejects Assertion That Famed Courtroom Stunt Was Rigged

You Must Acquit: O.J. Simpson struggles to put on glove in famed episode of 1995 murder trial.
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You Must Acquit: O.J. Simpson struggles to put on glove in famed episode of 1995 murder trial.

By Reuters

Published September 09, 2012.

(page 2 of 2)

Darden’s incendiary charge surprised key participants in the trial and related legal action. Harvard Law Professor Alan Dershowitz, who was a member of Simpson’s defense team, and Paul Callan, who represented Nicole Brown Simpson’s estate in a successful civil trial against Simpson, said it was the first time they had ever heard the allegation.

Darden’s remarks came after Dershowitz, a fellow panelist, called Darden’s decision to have Simpson try on the glove for the first time before the jury “the most stupid thing” a prosecutor could have done.

Dershowitz said that if Darden had evidence that there had been tampering, he would have had an ethical obligation to report the alleged misconduct. He also questioned why Darden hadn’t filed a grievance with the state bar association.

Darden responded by saying that this would have been a “whiny-little-snitch approach to life” and that was not what he believed in because it didn’t change anything.

The event was part of a “Trials and Errors” series, co-sponsored by Pace Law School and the Forum on Law, Culture & Society at Fordham Law, that examines America’s most controversial cases. Also on the panel were Goldman’s father, Fred Goldman, and his sister, Kim Goldman.

Derek Sells, the managing partner of Cochran’s old law firm, The Cochran Firm, did not respond to requests for comment.

A call to Cochran’s daughter, Tiffany Cochran Edwards, who is a communications director for the firm, was not immediately returned. Cochran died in 2005 from a brain tumor at age 67.

Simpson was acquitted in the double murder case despite what prosecutors described as a “mountain of evidence” against him. The evidence included a blood-soaked glove found on Simpson’s estate and a matching one found at the scene of the murder.

Questions about the lining of the gloves emerged during the 1995 trial, but they did not involve allegations of tampering by defense lawyers.

Three other members of Simpson’s defense team, Robert Shapiro, Barry Scheck and F Lee Bailey, did not immediately return requests for comment. Robert Kardashian, who also represented Simpson, is deceased.

A civil jury in 1997 found Simpson liable for the deaths and ordered him to pay $33.5 million in damages to the murder victims’ families.

Simpson is currently serving up to 33 years in prison for a 2007 armed robbery in which he claimed he was trying to recover his own sports memorabilia



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