Food Stamps Cuts Could Hit Jews Hard

Advocates Say Program Is Lifeline for Many Hasidic Families

By Susan Armitage

Published November 27, 2012.
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For Shabbat dinner last week, Daniel Sayani planned to eat rice and beans. He consulted Jewish law to determine the minimum amounts of bread and grape juice needed to bless the Friday night meal. Since his budget was just $1.50, saying the prayer over wine was out of the question.

Making Ends Meet: Daniel Sayani prepares to eat a spartan lunch. It’s all he can afford living on a $31.50-a-week food stamps budget.
susan armitage
Making Ends Meet: Daniel Sayani prepares to eat a spartan lunch. It’s all he can afford living on a $31.50-a-week food stamps budget.

Sayani chose to live on the average food stamp benefit of $31.50 for a week, joining activists around the country as part of the Jewish Community Food Stamp Challenge. He felt sick and cranky after cutting costly fresh fruits and vegetables – not to mention Starbucks coffee – out of his diet.

“It’s extremely humbling,” said Sayani, a cantor at Shore Parkway Jewish Center in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn and an intern at the Orthodox Jewish social justice organization Uri L’Tzedek.

Sayani’s experience was temporary, but it’s a daily reality for nearly 47 million Americans who benefit from what is formally called the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP). And with Congress working to pass a new version of the Farm Bill, which expired Sept. 30 and funds SNAP, their reality could very well change.

The Senate has proposed a $4.5 billion cut to SNAP over 10 years, while the House has proposed a $16 billion reduction over the same period. The deeper House cut would restrict states’ ability to expand SNAP eligibility to low-income people who don’t meet a federal asset test. The Congressional Budget Office estimates this change would reduce the number of SNAP recipients by about 1.8 million each year.

House Republicans also have proposed giving block grants to the states for SNAP, a move the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities says could reduce enrollment and benefit levels.

Changes to SNAP could significantly impact New York’s Jewish communities. About one in five Jewish households in the New York area is poor, according to a 2011 UJA-Federation study. Poverty is particularly concentrated among the fast-growing Hasidic population.

“If there are cuts, I really think people are going to feel it,” said Huvi Schmerler, a nutrition program coordinator at the non-profit Nachas Health and Family Network.


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